Tagged: Massive open online course Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • drdianehamilton 10:27 am on July 11, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Massive open online course, MOOCs, , Work Life Balance   

    Online Classes Offer Balance 

    shutterstock_83082013

    Online classes offer a variety of advantages for working adults who have enough on their plate without adding the stress of finding time for an education.  Probably the hardest part of attending a traditional university, for me, was finding time to fit it into my schedule.  I worked the traditional workday and then I had to make it to three-hour class four nights a week.  This was brutal because by the time I drove home and got to bed, it was close to midnight.  I would have to get up at 6 am and start all over again.  Thankfully I was in my early 20s at the time.  I honesty do not think I could handle that sort of schedule now.

    Traditional courses took at least four hours out of my day (to just attend class).  Then I had an hour or two of homework each day that I had to squeeze in either before midnight or on my lunch breaks.  At minimum, I probably spent at least five hours a day dealing with school-related issues.  In online classes, since there are no lectures, and there is no driving and parking, etc., I probably spent about two hours a day.  When you are a working adult with family responsibilities, saving three hours a day is huge.

    Traditional schools may be a great thing for people who have the time and money to afford them. Unfortunately many people do not have that luxury. Some students will have to obtain financial help whether they attend traditional or online courses.  The advantage of online courses is that students have more time to work to pay for the loans.

    I have read many articles about the value of a traditional education versus an online education.  Many of them have been written by professors who work in brick and mortar classrooms. I understand their perspective.  There may be some wonderful things to be learned at a traditional university.  The problem is that it is not that simple.  In today’s society, traditional roles have changed. Women may have much more responsibilities outside of the home.  The stress of raising a family, working, and trying to squeeze in time for education may make the choice of a traditional college a poor option.

    It is not appropriate to make blanket statements about all online courses based on limited experience. I have worked for many different online universities. They are not all the same.  Some offer a better education.  Comparing MOOCs to traditional online courses is like comparing apples to oranges.  The same is true about comparing unaccredited universities with accredited universities.

    Accredited online courses offer people a quality education and a life.  I do not believe that sitting in a lecture hall adds that much to the learning experience.  All of the driving, parking and sitting in class, took away precious time that I believe did not add to my educational experience.  All it did was stress me out and leave less time for others. Thankfully I finished my traditional education before my children were born.  Once I had a family, distance education became an option and opened up incredible opportunities for me.  It is interesting that traditional universities now offer more online courses.  The same institutions that had “issues” with online education now provide it.  The good news is that everyone is waking up and realizing that online education offers the best of all worlds for those who want it.

    Related Articles:

     
    • Shawn Dragonaire 4:33 pm on July 11, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I completely agree with your perspective on this specific topic. I have also been taking notice of more traditional non-profit colleges and universities starting to offer online course and gradually expanding into full programs. Thanks for sharing with us and it will be most interesting to observe how online degree programs start to become the accepted norm in public and private traditional colleges/universities within the next 5+ years.

  • drdianehamilton 9:47 am on July 8, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Massive open online course, ,   

    Online vs. Traditional Faculty Demands 

    shutterstock_122285089

    MOOCs have drawn attention to the different requirements of online vs. traditional teaching jobs.  I recently watched Dr. Dani Babb’s Udemy presentation titled How to Make Money Teaching as an Online Professor.  She said something that I thought was interesting.  She had worked as a traditional professor prior to becoming an online professor.  When she discussed the job requirements of an online professor, she mentioned that online professors have to deal with students who expect a lot more interaction in the online environment than the traditional one.  This is very true.  This is also something that I do not think gets enough attention in the media.

    There are plenty of articles about how wonderful traditional schools are compared to online schools. However, it has been my experience that online schools provide students with far more access to their professors.  This has increased the amount of responsibilities required of online professors.  Online professors must:

    1. Help students learn to think critically
    2. Guide students through a maze of information
    3. Help students learn critical information in a shorter amount of time
    4. Encourage students to form opinions and debate topics
    5. Provide tools for lifelong learning

    While the demands placed on online professors have increased, they may feel like they are being under-valued by the press.  Students expect more value.  Students want skills that lead to immediate job improvements. This has put pressure on educators. However, this kind of pressure is good because it creates a dialogue for how to improve the online experience.

    Related Articles:

     
    • Tammy Wilson 1:34 pm on July 8, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I agree with the online professor in reference to the article, On Line VS Traditional Faculty Demands.

      I went to a traditional school for my undergraduate degree. If I had to make a decision based on the short period of time that I have used the online educational service at GCU, to me there is no comparison, I have much more access and have had much better experience with the online instructors/Professors than I did in the traditional.

      I feel that it was the best decision that I made, by going online. There is more interaction, more communication, and more help from the Instructors/Professors. This is a wonderful experience for me!

      Thank You!

      Tammy Wilson
      MGT 605
      GCU

  • drdianehamilton 5:56 am on June 25, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Massive open online course, ,   

    Advantages of Peer Interaction in Online Learning 

    shutterstock_10410862

    One of the most important ways students learn in online courses is through peer-to-peer interaction.  In my experience with traditional classrooms, there were far more lectures and much student involvement.  The professors spoke “at us” in traditional courses. In online courses, there is more of a group discussion. Students receive the professor’s perspective as well as viewpoints from every student in the course.  In my opinion, this makes for a much more interesting and interactive classroom.

    Not all students are fans of lecture-based learning.  MOOCs may experience high dropout rates due to their lecture-based format. According to the article MOOCs: Will Online Courses Help More Students Stay in School, “Critics of MOOCs are quick to point out their low completion rates (fewer than 7% of students complete the courses on average). They also note that the courses take the ineffective lecture format and make it the primary mode of learning.”

    The types of online courses I have taught rely very little, if at all, on lectures.  The courses include more peer interaction and written assignments. The peer interaction revolves around discussion questions.  There are usually at least two discussion topics posted each week.  Students must respond to the initial question and respond to their peers’ postings as well.  This requires students to address the question, discover other students’ perspectives, and develop critical thinking skills.

    Students’ responses to their peers must include substantive comments and well-constructed follow-up questions.  These questions often develop the conversation and create a dialogue.  Every student can see these discussions.  Every student can interject their comments.  It creates a pool of information that would not be provided to students in a lecture hall.  It allows for much more depth to the exploration of the topic.

    In a traditional course, the professor may give their insight and opinions about a topic.  In an online course, this is possible as well. What is different is the amount of interaction required by the students.  Granted, things may have changed since I took traditional courses in the 80’s.  However, based on what I read and what I hear from my students, traditional college courses have not changed that much.  I believe that is why there is such an interest in MOOCs.  They add a new dimension that traditional courses have lacked.  However, MOOCs may not provide the peer interaction is the same way that regular online classes can.  The reason for this is due to the number of students in class.  MOOCs are massive.  Most online courses I teach include fewer than 20 students. When there are too many students, the discussions become overwhelming and no one takes the time to read all of the postings.

    The best part of peer interaction is that students can learn from everyone’s experiences. Many online students have had decades of experience. This provides a wealth of knowledge that may be added to the professor’s perspective.  This allows everyone, including the professor, to garner important insight.

    Related Articles:

     
    • Shawn Dragonaire 7:56 am on June 25, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for sharing this insightful article. I completely agree with your perspective. It is also very important for educators who favor teaching in a classroom-setting as a preferred learning environment to embrace and support non-traditional methods, because every student has a unique learning style that aligns best with their personality and individualized capacity to successfully comprehend the content being taught in a lesson plan.

  • drdianehamilton 9:54 am on March 7, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, , Duke, , , ITunesU, Kahn Academy, Massive open online course, MIT, , , TED Ed, UCLA, , Yale University   

    MOOCs: Top 10 Sites for Free Education With Elite Universities 

    MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Courses.  Although there has been access to free online courses on the Internet for years, the quality and quantity of courses has changed. Access to free courses has allowed students to obtain a level of education that many only could dream of in the past.  This has changed the face of education.  In The New York Times article Instruction for Masses Knocked Down Campus Walls, author Tamar Lewin stated, “in the past few months hundreds of thousands of motivated students around the world who lack access to elite universities have been embracing them as a path toward sophisticated skills and high-paying jobs, without paying tuition or collecting a college degree.”

    Although MOOCs are the latest trend, not everyone agrees that schools should offer them.  Joshua Kim Insight Higher Ed article Why Every University Does Not Need a MOOC noted that offering free material may not make sense for the individual university.  It may be more important to stand out in other ways.

    There may also be some issues for students who lack motivation.  Since a MOOC is voluntary and there is no penalty for dropping the program or lagging behind, there may be issues with course completion.  Although a student may have received an excellent education, there will not be a corresponding diploma.

    For those who desire a free education and have the motivation, the following includes the:  Top 10 Sites for Information about MOOCs:

    1. Udemy Free Courses – Udemy is an example of a site allows anyone to build or take online courses.  Udemy’s site exclaims, “Our goal is to disrupt and democratize education by enabling anyone to learn from the world’s experts.” The New York Times reported that Udemy, “recently announced a new Faculty Project, in which award-winning professors from universities like Dartmouth, the University of Virginia and Northwestern offer free online courses. Its co-founder, Gagen Biyani, said the site has more than 100,000 students enrolled in its courses, including several, outside the Faculty Project, that charge fees.”
    2. ITunesU Free Courses – Apple’s free app “gives students access to all the materials for courses in a single place. Right in the app, they can play video or audio lectures. Read books and view presentations.”
    3. Stanford Free Courses –  From Quantum Mechanics to The Future of the Internet, Stanford offers a variety of free courses.  Stanford’s – Introduction to Artificial Intelligence was highly successful. According to Pontydysgu.org, “160000 students from 190 countries signed up to Stanford’s Introduction to AI” course, with 23000 reportedly completing.”  Check out Stanford’s Engineering Everywhere link.
    4. UC Berkeley Free Courses – From General Biology to Human Emotion, Berkley offers a variety of courses.  Check out:  Berkeley Webcasts and Berkeley RSS Feeds.
    5. MIT Free Courses – Check out MIT’s RSS MOOC feed.  Also see:  MIT’s Open Courseware.
    6. Duke Free Courses – Duke offers a variety of courses on ITunesU.
    7. Harvard Free Courses – From Computer Science to Shakespeare, students may now get a free Harvard education. “Take a class for professional development, enrichment, and degree credit. Courses run in the fall, spring, or intensive January session. No application is required.”
    8. UCLA Free Courses – Check out free courses such as their writing program that offers over 220 online writing courses each year.
    9. Yale Free Courses – At Open Yale, the school offers “free and open access to a selection of introductory courses taught by distinguished teachers and scholars at Yale University. The aim of the project is to expand access to educational materials for all who wish to learn.”
    10. Carnegie Mellon Free Courses – Carnegie Mellon boosts “No instructors, no credits, no charge.”

     

    For younger students, check out the 60 Minutes video about Khan Academy and KhanAcademy.org.  Also check out Ted Ed.

    Related Articles:

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 249 other followers