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  • drdianehamilton 7:31 am on May 5, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Business and Economy, Car QR Code, , , , ,   

    Using Giant QR Codes on Cars to Promote Business 

    QR codes may offer sales people a new way to advertise.  Real estate agents are known to put company and contact information on cars as a form of advertisement.  Agents have even begun using QR codes on the “for sale” signs. Interested buyers can scan information about the home instantaneously into his or her cell phone.

    Now that QR codes are on just about everything, why not make them into a magnetic attachment for an automobile?  Chevy has already used QR codes on automobiles to promote car sales. “The vehicles are currently undergoing Southern California road testing, so the displayed QR codes will allow consumers to get a closer look at this vehicle even before it is available for sale.”

    How big can a QR code be?  Check out the 10,000 square foot QR code made that can be viewed from 2 miles up in the sky.

    Related Articles:

  • drdianehamilton 2:22 pm on October 28, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Anagrams, , Business and Economy, , epitaphs, extraordinary lists, , , oxymorons, pangrams, , , words   

    Top 5 Most Intriguing Lists 

    The How Stuff Works website is a great resource to find out just about everything about anything.  While doing research for my books, I ran into some interesting lists that I will be sharing with my students.  I particularly like the list of misspelled words, but check out the others on the list below:

    Top 5 Most Intriguing Lists
    While you can browse through hundreds of fascinating lists at Extraordinary Lists, here are 5 lists that we feel are certain to amaze and entertain:

  • drdianehamilton 3:51 pm on October 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Business and Economy, buzz words, , , , , , , jobsearch, keywords, , , resume writing,   

    Optimizing Your Resume Using Keywords on Sites Like LinkedIn 

    In my book: How to Reinvent Your Career, I give a lot of tips about how to get an interview and obtain a job. Part of being successful in the interview process is to have a strong resume. Keywords are a big part of getting your resume noticed.

    You may hear a lot about using keywords when optimizing websites. Now that sites like LinkedIn are increasing their searching capabilities, you may want to revisit how you have worded your online experience to be sure you are including appropriate buzz or key words. Employmentdigest.net suggests the following:

    1. Go to web sites that represent companies and associations related to the candidate’s target industry in search of other buzzwords.

    2. Search LinkedIn profiles of users who have similar jobs to see what keywords they’re using.

    3. Go to association websites to see what keywords other industry professionals have used.

    The specific words employers seek relate to the skills and experiences that demonstrate your experience with the skills necessary to do the job. Both hard and soft skills will fall in this category. Industry- and job-specific skills are almost always included in keyword lists. Highly technical fields can also include specific jargon or terms that demonstrate subject expertise. Job titles, certifications, types of degrees, college names and company names also demonstrate an applicant’s qualifications. Awards and professional organizations can also be considered strong keywords.

  • drdianehamilton 7:16 pm on September 5, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Business and Economy, , , , eportfolio, , , , , , , ,   

    What is an ePortfolio or Career Portfolio and How Do I Create One? 

    Today’s Ask Dr. Diane:  When I graduated from high school, I was told to set up a career portfolio.  What is that and how do I do it? 

    For a complete explanation for “what is a career portfolio” click here.  The basic definition of a career portfolio is a collection of things that represent your skills and accomplishments.  Like a resume, it contains your education, awards, honors, work experience and strengths. 

    There are several ways to develop a career portfolio.  You can find sites where you can pay to upload media you have designed or other things you would like to highlight to potential employers.  There are also a lot of free sites like Linkedin where you can display a lot of your information for others to find you and see your skills and abilities. Many professionals such as educators, journalists, artists and others have used career portfolios for years.  Recently many other types of job-seekers are finding that they want to be able to showcase more of their skills and abilities as well. 

    It can take a bit of a time commitment to initially set up your portfolio, but in the end, it will be easier to update and add things once it is prepared. 

    Quintcareers.com gives the following examples of things you should include in your portfolio:

    1. Career Summary and Goals: A description of what you stand for (such as work ethic, organizational interests, management philosophy, etc.) and where you see yourself in two to five years.
    2. Professional Philosophy/Mission Statement: A short description of the guiding principles that drive you and give you purpose. Read more in our article, Using a Personal Mission Statement to Chart Your Career Course.
    3. Traditional Resume: A summary of your education, achievements, and work experience, using a chronological or functional format. If you need help developing a resume, visit Quintessential Careers: Fundamentals of a Good Resume.
    4. Scannable/Text-Based Resume: A text-only version of your resume should also be included. More information about this type of resume can be found at: Quintessential Careers: Scannable Resume Fundamentals.
    5. Skills, Abilities and Marketable Qualities: A detailed examination of your skills and experience. This section should include the name of the skill area; the performance or behavior, knowledge, or personal traits that contribute to your success in that skill area; your background and specific experiences that demonstrate your application of the skill.
    6. List of Accomplishments: A detailed listing that highlights the major accomplishments in your career to date. Accomplishments are one of the most important elements of any good job-search. Read more in our article, For Job-Hunting Success: Track and Leverage Your Accomplishments.
    7. Samples of Your Work: A sampling of your best work, including reports, papers, studies, brochures, projects, presentations, etc. Besides print samples, you can also include CD-ROMs, videos, and other multimedia formats.
    8. Research, Publications, Reports: A way to showcase multiple skills, including your written communications abilities. Include any published papers and conference proceedings.
    9. Testimonials and Letters of Recommendations: A collection of any kudos you have received -– from customers, clients, colleagues, past employers, professors, etc. Some experts even suggest including copies of favorable employer evaluations and reviews.
    10. Awards and Honors: A collection of any certificates of awards, honors, and scholarships.
    11. Conference and Workshops: A list of conferences, seminars, and workshops you’ve participated in and/or attended.
    12. Transcripts, Degrees, Licenses, and Certifications: A description of relevant courses, degrees, licenses, and certifications.
    13. Professional Development Activities: A listing of professional associations and conferences attended — and any other professional development activities.
    14. Military records, awards, and badges: A listing of your military service, if applicable.
    15. Volunteering/Community Service: A description of any community service activities, volunteer or pro bono work you have completed, especially as it relates to your career.
    16. References List: A list of three to five people (including full names, titles, addresses, and phone/email) who are willing to speak about your strengths, abilities, and experience. At least one reference should be a former manager. Read more in our article: The Keys to Choosing and Using the Best Job References in Your Job Search.

    eHow has a useful article for how to create your online career portfolio for free. 

    They also suggest the following tips and warnings:

    Tips & Warnings

    • Creating an online portfolio will increase your chance of landing your dream job
    • Always be honest with yourself when displaying your qualifications
    • Give your website address to prospective employers to market yourself
    • Don’t be dishonest because it will backfire!
    • Only give your website to legitimate employers
    • Do not include official transcripts online because it includes your SSN
    • Only give your personal information to only jobs you have applied for
    • Do not include your web portfolio address on your online resume with any online career site such as Monster, Hot Jobs, Vault and Career Path. Read more by clicking here.

    The Fox School of Business had an interesting article about how you should spend a moment to Google yourself to see what others might find out about you online.  They reference the following statistics:  44% of hiring managers use google, myspace, and facebook to do online background checks on candidates. Nearly 1/3 of these background checks lead to rejection of a candidate.

    Some tips they suggest to create your own online image include:

    1. Join Linkedin.com.  This is a great site that will allow you to create a professional social networking “resume” and allows you the chance to connect to a lot of great contacts.  Your linkedin.com profile will also show up when you google your name.  Use this to your advantage and list all of your strengths, education, and experience using well written short descriptions. 
    2. Start a blog.  Starting a blog is not just for people with uncommon niche interests.  Find a topic you find interesting and is relevant to your professional life and write in it often.  Read other blogs on industry news and comment.  All of these small things will help to create a good social presence for your on the internet. 
    3. Check your Myspace and Facebook profiles.  If there is anything that would give an employer the wrong impression of you, take it down!  Pictures should be professional.  You can stand out from the pack if you use your myspace or facebook page as another tool in your job search strategy.  Not everyone has the attitude of “it’s just a social profile.”  Make sure all privacy settings are enabled so only close friends can see things about you.
    4. For those more web savvy people, start a website or create an online resume.  These can be great additions to your paper resume and you can certainly include a link to your online resume on your paper resume and in any footings or signatures of any emails you send to employers regarding your job search.   You can detail more experiences, share some volunteer experiences and even include pictures, showcase some examples of your work.  Be careful with this though….professionalism is of utmost importance.

    A useful student-centered platform for building an eportfolio is available at eportfolio.org.  Once you register, you can set up your portfolio as a student, faculty or institution.  You can then control what goes into your portfolio, who can see it, and can create several versions of it to use based on who you want to view it.  There are fees for this based on how many megabytes of storage you would require. 

    In schools, some students are being taught to create web pages using a virtual learning environmental (VLE) that are not as easily accessible outside of the environment in which they are created.  A good alternative for a student who wants a format that is easier to share outside a school environment, would be to get signed up with a free account on Linkedin.  Linkedin has added a lot of features that allows people to showcase more than just work experience.  Users can also import Google Docs presentations, include a WordPress blog, and there are many more options available to update and promote abilities to prospective employers or potential connections.

    For an example of a Linkedin portfolio, you can look at mine by clicking here.  To see all of the options I have added to mine, you can send me a request to be linkedin with you.  I accept all invitations.  At that point, you can see how I have incorporated Google Docs, WordPress and other features to display my information.

  • drdianehamilton 2:06 pm on August 30, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Business and Economy, Cover letter, Distribution, , Employment Digest, Executive, Resumes and Portfolios,   

    How To Make A Cover Letter Template Work For You | EmploymentDigest.net 

    Since employers receive thousands of resumes every year, a bad cover letter can keep your resume from being viewed. Employers will simply push your resume aside and pick someone with a more intriguing cover letter.

    A cover letter template can be a great start when writing your letter. There are several misconceptions that need to be addressed when using a template, though. For instance, often times we spend hours composing the perfect resume and spend around 10 minutes preparing our cover letter. People grab a quick letter template and barely change anything. Your cover letter leads up to the most important element for landing you an interview.

    4 Tips For Customizing Templates

    1. Chances are you aren’t the only one that downloaded a cover letter template and barely changed it. Having the same cover letter as your competitors won’t help you land your dream job. You need to stand out from the crowd so, make sure you only use the template as a general guideline. Really customize your cover letter to make it stand out and get noticed.

    3. Don’t just fill in the blanks on your template. It’s best just to look at a template to get an idea of what should be included in the letter and how to structure it. You want yours to be custom and unique. Use your content in an organized fashion but it doesn’t have to match the template exactly. Get creative and get noticed by employers.

    4. Make your cover letter personalized by addressing it to an actual person. This will really set you apart from competitors especially if they are using the run of the mill cover letter with no customization. The main goal of your cover letter is to catch the reader’s attention and get you an interview. Specially address their company within the letter and get the interview you deserve!

    Following these simple tips can make using templates work for you not against you in your job hunt.

    Compare the top resume writing services all in one place. Choose the right one for you by visiting http://www.ResumeLines.com

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