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  • drdianehamilton 3:38 pm on August 4, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Distance Learning, , , , ,   

    Adjunct Faculty Members’ Perceptions of Online Education Compared to Traditional Education 

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    I am often asked to give my opinion regarding online education versus traditional education.  Because it is such a popular topic, I decided to conduct some research to determine how online instructors’ perceive online versus traditional degrees. The following is an abstract from my most recent study published in the Journal for Online Doctoral Education.

    “Due to the growth of online courses and universities, the quality and benefits of distance education warrant
    scholarly attention. Previous researchers have focused on students’, employers’, and traditional professors’
    perspectives of online courses. Although adjunct professors teach the majority of online courses, few
    researchers have explored their opinions of online education compared to traditional, face-to-face education.
    Also lacking is information about online instructors’ perceptions of the online teaching position. The purpose
    of this report was to present online adjunct faculty members’ perceptions of online education in relation to
    traditional education. Sixty-eight adjunct faculty members who were recruited through LinkedIn voluntarily
    completed an instrument that was developed for this purpose. Given that this report represents an initial
    attempt to understand this phenomenon, preliminary results are reported as descriptive statistics. Overall,
    the online adjunct faculty members held favorable opinions of online education and believed that others did
    as well. Although they reported grading similarly in online courses as in traditional courses, the online
    adjunct faculty members reported that students thought that online professors graded more easily.
    Limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.”

    To read the entire study, please click the following link: Adjunct Faculty Members’ Perceptions of Online Education Compared to Traditional Education

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  • drdianehamilton 10:27 am on July 11, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Distance Learning, , , , , MOOCs, , Work Life Balance   

    Online Classes Offer Balance 

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    Online classes offer a variety of advantages for working adults who have enough on their plate without adding the stress of finding time for an education.  Probably the hardest part of attending a traditional university, for me, was finding time to fit it into my schedule.  I worked the traditional workday and then I had to make it to three-hour class four nights a week.  This was brutal because by the time I drove home and got to bed, it was close to midnight.  I would have to get up at 6 am and start all over again.  Thankfully I was in my early 20s at the time.  I honesty do not think I could handle that sort of schedule now.

    Traditional courses took at least four hours out of my day (to just attend class).  Then I had an hour or two of homework each day that I had to squeeze in either before midnight or on my lunch breaks.  At minimum, I probably spent at least five hours a day dealing with school-related issues.  In online classes, since there are no lectures, and there is no driving and parking, etc., I probably spent about two hours a day.  When you are a working adult with family responsibilities, saving three hours a day is huge.

    Traditional schools may be a great thing for people who have the time and money to afford them. Unfortunately many people do not have that luxury. Some students will have to obtain financial help whether they attend traditional or online courses.  The advantage of online courses is that students have more time to work to pay for the loans.

    I have read many articles about the value of a traditional education versus an online education.  Many of them have been written by professors who work in brick and mortar classrooms. I understand their perspective.  There may be some wonderful things to be learned at a traditional university.  The problem is that it is not that simple.  In today’s society, traditional roles have changed. Women may have much more responsibilities outside of the home.  The stress of raising a family, working, and trying to squeeze in time for education may make the choice of a traditional college a poor option.

    It is not appropriate to make blanket statements about all online courses based on limited experience. I have worked for many different online universities. They are not all the same.  Some offer a better education.  Comparing MOOCs to traditional online courses is like comparing apples to oranges.  The same is true about comparing unaccredited universities with accredited universities.

    Accredited online courses offer people a quality education and a life.  I do not believe that sitting in a lecture hall adds that much to the learning experience.  All of the driving, parking and sitting in class, took away precious time that I believe did not add to my educational experience.  All it did was stress me out and leave less time for others. Thankfully I finished my traditional education before my children were born.  Once I had a family, distance education became an option and opened up incredible opportunities for me.  It is interesting that traditional universities now offer more online courses.  The same institutions that had “issues” with online education now provide it.  The good news is that everyone is waking up and realizing that online education offers the best of all worlds for those who want it.

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    • Shawn Dragonaire 4:33 pm on July 11, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I completely agree with your perspective on this specific topic. I have also been taking notice of more traditional non-profit colleges and universities starting to offer online course and gradually expanding into full programs. Thanks for sharing with us and it will be most interesting to observe how online degree programs start to become the accepted norm in public and private traditional colleges/universities within the next 5+ years.

  • drdianehamilton 5:56 am on June 25, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Distance Learning, , , , , , , ,   

    Advantages of Peer Interaction in Online Learning 

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    One of the most important ways students learn in online courses is through peer-to-peer interaction.  In my experience with traditional classrooms, there were far more lectures and much student involvement.  The professors spoke “at us” in traditional courses. In online courses, there is more of a group discussion. Students receive the professor’s perspective as well as viewpoints from every student in the course.  In my opinion, this makes for a much more interesting and interactive classroom.

    Not all students are fans of lecture-based learning.  MOOCs may experience high dropout rates due to their lecture-based format. According to the article MOOCs: Will Online Courses Help More Students Stay in School, “Critics of MOOCs are quick to point out their low completion rates (fewer than 7% of students complete the courses on average). They also note that the courses take the ineffective lecture format and make it the primary mode of learning.”

    The types of online courses I have taught rely very little, if at all, on lectures.  The courses include more peer interaction and written assignments. The peer interaction revolves around discussion questions.  There are usually at least two discussion topics posted each week.  Students must respond to the initial question and respond to their peers’ postings as well.  This requires students to address the question, discover other students’ perspectives, and develop critical thinking skills.

    Students’ responses to their peers must include substantive comments and well-constructed follow-up questions.  These questions often develop the conversation and create a dialogue.  Every student can see these discussions.  Every student can interject their comments.  It creates a pool of information that would not be provided to students in a lecture hall.  It allows for much more depth to the exploration of the topic.

    In a traditional course, the professor may give their insight and opinions about a topic.  In an online course, this is possible as well. What is different is the amount of interaction required by the students.  Granted, things may have changed since I took traditional courses in the 80’s.  However, based on what I read and what I hear from my students, traditional college courses have not changed that much.  I believe that is why there is such an interest in MOOCs.  They add a new dimension that traditional courses have lacked.  However, MOOCs may not provide the peer interaction is the same way that regular online classes can.  The reason for this is due to the number of students in class.  MOOCs are massive.  Most online courses I teach include fewer than 20 students. When there are too many students, the discussions become overwhelming and no one takes the time to read all of the postings.

    The best part of peer interaction is that students can learn from everyone’s experiences. Many online students have had decades of experience. This provides a wealth of knowledge that may be added to the professor’s perspective.  This allows everyone, including the professor, to garner important insight.

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    • Shawn Dragonaire 7:56 am on June 25, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for sharing this insightful article. I completely agree with your perspective. It is also very important for educators who favor teaching in a classroom-setting as a preferred learning environment to embrace and support non-traditional methods, because every student has a unique learning style that aligns best with their personality and individualized capacity to successfully comprehend the content being taught in a lesson plan.

  • drdianehamilton 5:34 am on June 18, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Distance Learning, , , , , Master's degree, ,   

    What to Expect in Online Doctorate Degree Courses 

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    As a doctoral chair, it is my responsibility to help guide students through their doctoral dissertation process.  In order to receive a doctorate through online courses, there is a series of courses that students take prior to the time they begin writing the proposal for their dissertation.  Each online program varies to some degree.  Based on the two programs I have either taken or taught, I can say that they were pretty similar.  The following is what students might expect from an online doctoral program.

    Students must first complete a series of online courses that address their field of study. For example, I received a degree that is titled: Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration with a Specialization in Management.  That means that those initial courses included a specific focus on business management.  Some students may combine their Master’s with their Doctorate.  Assuming that students have already taken the thirty or so credits required for a Master’s degree, there may be another 10 or 15 courses required in the field of specialization. In this case, it would be to study business management.  These courses are not that different from taking graduate-level classes.

    After finishing those courses, students begin taking courses that are more specific to the proposal and final dissertation.  It is difficult to state how many courses may be required at this point. Some students require fewer courses than others based on how much work they complete within the scheduled time for each course.  I have had some students make it through the dissertation in the process by taking only three dissertation courses.  Others may take a dozen or more courses to finish.  It depends upon how much students have done on their own prior to beginning the doctoral courses, how quickly they work, and the type of research they do.

    The steps in the doctoral process include writing the proposal (which describes how the study will be performed, aka chapters 1-3 of the final dissertation), obtaining proposal approval, doing the research, writing the final dissertation (updating Chapters 1-3 and writing Chapters 4-5), obtaining approval for the dissertation, defending the dissertation in an oral presentation, and finally having the doctoral chair, doctoral committee, and dean give a final seal of approval.

    The hardest part generally seems to be writing the proposal or the first three chapters.  This is difficult because students have to learn how to write in a very specific and scholarly way.  There are templates that may provide helpful information regarding alignment, content requirements, and formatting.   Students work very closely with their chair during this time.  Students must also have at least two committee members.  Some schools, like the one I attended, required an additional outside member to review the dissertation.  All members of the committee must have a doctorate.

    Students usually work strictly with the chair until Chapters 1-3 are ready to submit. At that point, the committee looks at the work to give input and make suggestions.  After all adjustments are made, the proposal goes through several stages of approval.  Students may need to submit more than once if there are changes requested. This is commonly the case.  Once the proposal is approved, students can perform the study, and eventually write the last two chapters that describe the results.  This final document goes through the chair and committee approval process again, and eventually must meet with the dean’s approval.  The last step is for students to defend the dissertation in an oral presentation.  Usually that is the easiest part of the process because students know their study inside and out by that time.  It takes some students just a few years to go through the process.  Others take much longer. Some never finish.  It is a very difficult process.  However, in the end, it is worth it.

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  • drdianehamilton 11:52 pm on September 4, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Distance Learning, , , , Mark Bauerlein, , Professors in the United States, , Tenure,   

    Adjunct Advantages: The Future of Education 

    Professors who work on a contracted, part-time basis are referred to as adjuncts.  There are advantages for universities that hire adjuncts rather than tenured faculty. However, many adjunct professors do not like this option.  Some refer to the way things have changed in the university system as adjunct purgatory, with low pay, few benefits and no security. 

    There is no shortage of articles that point out the problems with adjuncts.  In an article from MindingTheCampus, author Mark Bauerlein stated, “The practice creates a two-tier system, with tenured and tenure-track folks on one, adjuncts on the other.  Adjuncts take up most of the undergraduate teaching, enabling the others to conduct their research and handle upper-division and graduate courses, thus maintaining a grating hierarchy that damages group morale.  Also, because of their tenuous status, adjuncts can’t give students the attention they deserve and they can’t apply the rigor they should.”

    These problems are more often associated with traditional campuses.  However, the future of education is headed toward more online learning.  In fact, according to Campustechnology.com, “Nearly 12 million post-secondary students in the United States take some or all of their classes online right now. But this will skyrocket to more than 22 million in the next five years.”  In private online institutions, adjunct positions can actually be more lucrative due to the ability that faculty may teach multiple classes for multiple universities. 

     

    The reason there are so many negative articles about adjuncts is that in the traditional setting, they have a completely different set of issues than those in the online setting.  There are many positives that should be noted for adjuncts in online learning. Some of the positives from the universities’ perspective (online or traditional) include: Not having to offer tenure, having flexibility in course offerings and paying less money per course.

    There are even more advantages for online adjuncts from the faculty’s perspective:

    • Ability to work at multiple universities
    • No driving to campuses
    • Less meetings to attend
    • No need to publish research
    • Ability to work any time of the day in asynchronous courses
    • Ability to have other jobs at the same time
    • Ability to travel and still teach without taking time off
    • Option to have some of the same benefits with some universities offering 401k, insurance and reduced tuition costs for the adjunct and their family

    For those considering an adjunct online position, a site like higheredjobsis a great place to find teaching opportunities. For more information about adjunct salaries, check out SalaryBlog.org.  

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  • drdianehamilton 9:46 pm on October 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Distance Learning, , , , elearners, , , Perception, ,   

    How Employers View an Online Education 

    In the book The Online Student’s User Manual, I wrote quite a bit about online universities, their perception by employers and how they compare to traditional universities. Check out the following article from elearners.com that gives some interesting statistics about employer’s perception of online education, also see my previous posting about some of these results by clicking here.

    How do employers view online degrees?

    How do potential employers view online courses and degrees? How are job candidates viewed based on their academic credentials, online or traditional? Under what circumstances are online degrees viewed as a “non-issue” or an asset for job applicants?

    These were some of the questions posed in Hiring Practices and Attitudes: Traditional vs. Online Degree Credentials, research undertaken by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and commissioned by eLearners.com, a web resource of EducationDynamics, which connects prospective students with online degrees. And as with a number of similar studies undertaken over the past ten years, the results reflect an interesting and transitioning set of assumptions among hiring managers about the value of online degrees and degree-holders.

    See the key findings as an infographic!

    To read the rest of the article click here:  elearners.com
     
  • drdianehamilton 2:41 pm on September 20, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Distance Learning, , , , , Harvard online, , , , , online degree, perception of online degree, traditional degree   

    How Are Online Degrees Perceived? 

    I often get into Linkedin group discussions about the pros and cons of online learning.  I address it in depth in my book, The Online Student’s User Manual.  I thought eLearners.com had a pretty good article about the acceptance of online degrees.  To read the entire article click here.

     

    In that article, hiring managers were asked how they felt about strictly online learning environments.  It was close to 50/50 in terms of whether they felt it was favorable or not.  The acceptance got better with the schools that had both regular classes and online classes offered. 

    I have taken both traditional and online courses.  I personally prefer online learning.  I think it will become more and more the norm.  I feel I learned more and had a much better experience in my online business classes because I was not forced to be in as many group-related activities.  In my traditional university experience, I witnessed a lot of business majors getting their bachelor degree based on being in groups where they contributed nothing and got A’s because the rest of the group did the work. 

    I think a lot of people are slow to accept technology because it is a big change. However, online learning is here and it is growing.  I work for many online universities where I see very strict guidelines enforced.  I have people monitoring my classes constantly.  I get feedback and direction to be sure I am staying on track and offering only the highest in quality education. 

    Perhaps a lot of the perception is due to the profit or non-profit status of schools.  I think a lot is name recognition.  Big-named schools like Harvard now offer online courses.  To find out more about that program, click here. I think as more schools like Harvard add distance education, it will only improve the perception of online education.

     
    • Online Courses 5:20 am on September 30, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Good points on online degrees. Online degree programs will enable you to study at your own pace and you won’t be restrained to one schedule.

    • Trident Online Education 4:11 pm on September 8, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      It’s good to see that online degrees are becoming more acceptable to a large number of employers. It is true that grading in traditional business tends to be based on the work produced by the group as whole which allows individual members to slack off. You’re more responsible for your own work with most online education programs.

  • drdianehamilton 7:09 pm on September 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Distance Learning, , , Hunting, , MERLOT, , President of the United States, , Sloan-C   

    Top 10 Free Online Courses 

    Teaching Online Courses – Top 10 Free Courses  from GetEducated.com

    via Teaching Online Courses – Top 10 Free Courses | GetEducated.com.

    Check out this article to find some great resources for online instructors including sites to teach best practices, developing course content, designing classes, tips on distance education, step-by-step training videos, links to sites like MERLOT which has vast resources for online instructors and of course a link to Sloan-C.

     
  • drdianehamilton 1:00 pm on September 7, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Distance Learning, , , , , , Educational Webinar, , , , , Successful Online Student, ,   

    Student Success Secrets Revealed by Author Whose Book is Required Reading at Arizona University 

    Dr. Diane Hamilton’s new book, The Online Student’s User Manual: Everything You Need to Know to be a Successful Online Student, may be geared toward the online learner, but instructors and online professionals can also learn from her advice. To find out tips and insight regarding how to help online students succeed, Dr. Hamilton will be conducting a webinar for the Sloan Consortium on October 27, 2010. This is an excellent opportunity to find out why online universities have tapped into Dr. Hamilton’s expertise to help their students succeed. Author and professor, Dr. Diane Hamilton’s (http://drdianehamilton.com/), new book will be required reading for all new online students at an Arizona university and is being considered as an addition at several other universities. To find out more about how to help online students excel, educators can access the webinar through Sloan’s website and students can obtain the book in paperback and digital formats through Amazon.

    Help for online students and online professors.

    Quote start“As a former online learner myself and online professor for more than a decade, I can say this is by far the best book I have read on becoming a successful online learner. I WILL recommend this book to my learners.” Quote endDr. Dani Babb Author and Professor

    Tempe, AZ (PRWEB) September 7, 2010

    The Online Student’s User Manual had been published less than two weeks by the time a well-respected Arizona technical university sought to include it as required reading for all of their new online learners.

    Some of the things the new online student will learn from Dr. Hamilton’s book include:

    *computer and software requirements
    *how to use the search engines and upload assignments
    *how to organize and manage your time
    *how to track and schedule your assignments
    *how to communicate effectively with your professors and fellow students
    *how to maximize your grade
    *what mistakes to avoid
    *how to create measurable goals and stay motivated
    *how to prepare for tests…and so much more.

    Dr. Hamilton currently works as an online professor for 6 different universities. She has taken her experiences and incorporated them into her book to help online learners succeed. Now she is taking it one step further, as she shares her expertise with other online professionals. Dr. Hamilton will be conducting a Student Success Strategies Webinar for The Sloan-Consortium, Sloan-C, on October 27, 2010 at 2:00 pm EST. Sloan-C is an institutional and professional organization that integrates online education into mainstream education For more information go to SloanConsortium.org or click here.

    Online professors who attend this webinar will learn ways to improve their students’ skills in the following areas:

    *Navigation
    *Terminology
    *Academic Honesty
    *Goal Setting
    *Time Management
    *Motivation
    *Increasing Retention
    *Understanding Learning Preferences
    *Writing and Formatting
    *Test Preparation Techniques

    About the Author

    Diane Hamilton currently teaches bachelor-, master-, and doctoral-level courses. Along with her teaching experience, she has a Doctorate Degree in Business Management and more than twenty-five years of business and management-related experience. To find out more about her writing or to schedule an interview, visit her website at http://drdianehamilton.com or her blog at https://drdianehamilton.wordpress.com/. Review copies are available.

    The Online Student’s User Manual is available in paperback and digital formats–August, 2010 ($14.95/ Amazon). ISBN: 0982742800/9780982742808 Approximately –184 pages

     

     
  • drdianehamilton 11:41 am on September 5, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Distance Learning, , , , helium.com, , , , ,   

    Advantages and disadvantages of online education classes – Helium 

    I recently responded to an article on Helium.com that addressed the advantages and disadvantages of online education.  Here is my response to the disadvantages that were listed:

    I am an online professor and teach for 6 different universities.  I found your topic about advantages and disadvantages of online learning to be interesting.  I would like to address the disadvantages you mentioned and give my insight based on my many years of teaching experience.

    Uniformity – My students don’t have to necessarily have the same exact computer set up that every other student has.  All students can go to their local library for computer access if necessary.  Some online courses require the ability to view videos, etc.  But for the most part, the standard computer setup handles most of the needs that students have.  I try to include several different ways of reaching students based upon their learning needs.  If a student prefers to learn through audio files, for example, then that student would probably be wise to have a system that allows that type of access.  The good professor will incorporate several types of visual, audio, etc. choices to reach the different learners’ preferences. In fact, I will be teaching a webinar through Sloan-C in October to explain how to do this for new online learners.

    Disconnection – You mentioned it is easy to never log in, and never to return email, etc.  It is just as easy to sleep in and not feel like driving to class.  The advantage the student has here is that if they do sleep in, they won’t miss class and they can log on when they wake up.  I agree that no system has a true solution for those with poor behaviors. However, I do think that online offers advantages for both the introvert and extrovert personalities.  The introvert has more time to think about what they want to type.  The extrovert has the ability to delete the thing they may have needed to rethink.

    Authenticity – I received my BS at a school where over 300 students would be in one classroom. It would be very hard to be sure that the student taking those tests were actually who they said they were as well.  The good thing that is available now is software like Turnitin that allows the professor to be sure that the work turned in is not plagiarized or “purchased” off of the Internet. 

    I agree the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages. I believe online learning is the future of education and we need to embrace it.

     
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