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  • drdianehamilton 7:49 am on April 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Employees, , , Leadership, , ,   

    Improving Employee Engagement 

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    Employers struggle with a variety of motivation and emotion-based issues with employees. How to attract, engage, and inspire top talent to create winning teams is one of the most requested keynotes.  This is usually combined with some form of addressing generational differences, communication, culture, leadership, teamwork, and personality conflict.  Engagement has been broken down into three parts by Gallup including engaged (13%), not engaged (63%), and actively disengaged (60%).

    Engagement

    With such a large percentage of workers in the category of not engaged, it brings attention to the costs involved with ambivalence.  If workers are not engaged, they do not put forth any extra effort, they are less innovative, less effective at customer service, less loyal, more likely to job hop, and are less productive.  Ambivalent workers are there to get a paycheck, but they are not likely to volunteer for much more.  They may be harder to spot because they are not necessarily unhappy, but they do not feel connected to the organization and therefore, are less concerned about customers, profitability, and safety.  They are more likely to leave, resulting in costly turnover expenses.

    Consider the costs associated with engagement:

    • The U.S. economy loses $250 billion a year to turnover; there is a loss of $30.5 billion just for Millennials
    • Cost of a disengaged employee averages $3400 per $10,000 in salary
    • Engaged companies have a 6% higher net profit margin and grow profits three times faster
    • Managers spend up to 40% of their day dealing with conflict and engagement-related issues
    • Companies with low engagement scores have 32.7% less operating income

    For a complete list of costs involved in engagement, check out 2016 Employee Engagement/Retention Statistics.  There are ways to improve employee engagement. These include:

    • Make engagement a priority
    • Read the SRHM and Deloitte studies for an in-depth understanding of engagement
    • Recognize the importance of understanding emotional aspects of employee behavior
    • Determine levels of engagement to get a baseline
    • Meet with employees and teams to open a dialogue and develop trust
    • Have engaged employees mentor those who are not engaged
    • Determine if employees are in jobs that match their preferences and skills
    • Examine feedback, respect, and recognition employees receive – the number one driver of engagement is recognition
    • Link compensation to engagement

    Engagement may vary based on generations and length of service to the company.  As Millennials become the largest group in the workplace, it behooves leaders to learn more about how to attract and retain this group.  They do not require long, detailed-recognition, but frequent notifications that they are doing well and are on track may be very important to their emotional commitment.

    Engagement2

    Leaders should recognize that the way people work must be evaluated. The days of 8 to 5, no flexibility, and yearly performance reviews are no longer the norm.  People require frequent recognition and feedback.  Leaders who schedule time for feedback will be the ones who reap the rewards. Now that 40% of global workers are remote, it is important to find new ways to connect and to empower people to work virtually.  The successful leaders will begin by hiring the best people, monitor their outcomes, and continue to provide feedback, respect, recognition, and support.

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  • drdianehamilton 2:16 pm on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Expert, , Leadership, , , , , Speaker Match, Trainer   

    Expert Speaker and Trainer, Dr. Diane Hamilton, Available for Corporate Events 

    I have updated my speaker and training bio. Please click on the picture below to watch the video. To contact me for an event, please go to http://www.speakermatch.com/profile/drdianehamilton/

     
  • drdianehamilton 7:52 pm on April 6, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , Leadership, , , , ,   

    MBTI and Business Executives Inflated View of Emotional Intelligence 

    Those interested in how personality affects performance often study the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or Emotional Intelligence (EI) and the relationship to leadership.  Rarely do I run across studies that look for relationships between MBTI and EI.  Leary, Reilly and Brown published a Study of Personality Preferences and Emotional Intelligence where they examined the “relationships between the dispositional factors measured by the MBTI and elements of emotional intelligence (EI) as measured by Bar-On’s emotional quotient inventory (EQ-i).”

    For those unfamiliar with the MBTI and the EQ-I, the MBTI measures our preferences for how we like to receive information.  The EQ-i measures our emotional quotient or EQ.  Emotional intelligence has often been defined differently by various authors.  One of the easiest ways to think of emotional intelligence is by defining it as the ability to understand your own emotions as well as those in others. 

    In the Leary et al study, their results showed a relationship between Myers Briggs extroversion and emotional intelligence components.  Also noted in the study was a “positive and significant relationship between a preference for the use of feeling in decision making and an individual’s EI.”

    When discussing “feeling” as defined by the MBTI, it refers to how one bases their decisions on their values.  When discussing “extroversion” as defined by the MBTI, it refers to how people prefer to focus on the outer world of people and things.  Leary et al concluded, “The positive and significant results for the extroversion and feeling hypotheses seem consistent with the view that EI is related to the ability to accurately perceive and manage relationships.”  

    I found the relationship for “feeling” to be the most interesting part of the study due to the high number of “thinking” as opposed to “feeling” executives in the workplace.   The study suggests that using “feeling” when making decisions shows awareness of others’ feelings.  This would be indicative of having emotional intelligence.  

    If there are more “thinking” people in business executive positions and this study showed people that were “feeling” had more of a relationship to emotional intelligence, what does that say about our business leaders?  A study of nearly 5000 people by Sala revealed that executives may have an inflated idea of how high their emotional intelligence actually is.  “The results of this study demonstrate that higher-level employees are more likely to have an inflated view of their emotional intelligence competencies and less congruence with the perceptions of others who work with them often and know them well than lower-level employees.” 

    What is interesting to note is that one’s MBTI type does not usually change over time.  However, one can develop their emotional intelligence.  The “thinking” personality type bases their decisions on data.  They tend to be logical.    If people with a strong “thinking” preference do not show as high of a correlation with emotional intelligence now, can they develop this based on their understanding of this data?   It seems logical to conclude this is possible.

    As with any self-reported data, there are possible limitations to these studies.  I personally have studied emotional intelligence and its impact on sales performance.  I had to take the EQ-i and the MBTI in my training to be a qualified instructor for both assessments.  I came out as an ESTJ and had a high EQ-i score.  I may be an anomaly, but from what I have seen from the work of Daniel Goleman and others, whether someone is a “thinking” or a “feeling” personality, it is important to always be working on one’s EQ in order to be successful.   

     
  • drdianehamilton 5:55 pm on September 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Education and Training, , , Leadership, , , Time Tracking   

    Top Ten Things Employers Are Looking for in New Employees 

    Indeed.com lists the following top things employers would like to see in potential  new hires:

    To read the full article,  click here.

     
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