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  • drdianehamilton 9:14 am on June 26, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Google Scholar, , research, , , ,   

    Changing the Way Students Perform Online Research 

    shutterstock_110293586

    Google and other search engines have changed the way people locate information.  The problem is that online students think of Google as a proper tool to use to perform research for assignments.  Google Scholar may provide access to some scholarly research.  However, most online schools prefer that students use the school’s library search feature.  It is important that students consider the reliability of the type of content that is available on traditional websites.

    Pew reported that the majority of students are not able to recognize bias in online content.  This has become frustrating for professors because these skills should be taught in first-year college courses.  Turnitin’s white paper titled What’s Wrong with Wikipedia, reported that in over 37 million papers submitted by students, there were 156 million matches to content found from the Internet.  This means that students use sites like Google Books, May Clinic, Yahoo Answers, Wikipedia, etc.  These are unacceptable sources to use for college-level courses.

    According to Turnitin’s research, the following problems exist with student’s research behavior:

    • Problem: Students value immediacy over quality – Students use sites like Wikipedia to find quick answers.  Wikipedia may offer some valuable resources at the bottom of their site to support the content. Solution:  These sources are usually available through the school’s library search feature.  Schools’ search engines are quite easy to use. They access some of the best material available for free.  Students can easily mark a box for peer-reviewed studies.  This will ensure that their research contains quality information.
    • Problem:  Students often use cheat sites – Students may find sites that offer to write their papers for a fee.  Most of these papers are captured within Turnitin’s plagiarism detecting software. Therefore when students buy the paper and submit as their own, the software will detect it as plagiarized.  Solution:  The time it takes to find and buy a paper on the Internet could have been used to simply write an original paper.  Nothing is gained from submitted plagiarized work.  Students risk getting expelled.  Most assignments are not that long or difficult.  The point of writing them is to gain knowledge.  Students who attend school just to obtain a piece of paper will not be prepared for the working world.  They will spend money on a degree that will not help them if they have not learned the information.
    • Problem:  Research is not synonymous with search – Students may put a lot of faith in the information found on the Internet.  Just because a site allows people to ask and answer questions, does not mean that the answers are correct. Searching for answers on the Internet does not mean that the answers are based on actual research.  Solution:  Using peer-reviewed sources that are available through the school’s library ensures that the information in the article has been reviewed by the author’s peers.  These studies are actual research.

    There are times when assignments allow for students to use websites like Apple.com, or other corporate or news sites.  If this is allowed by the instructor, students must be able to recognize if the site is highly regarded. An example might be The New York Times.  If students are in doubt, they should direct questions to their instructor for guidance.

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  • drdianehamilton 8:52 am on July 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , research, ,   

    Marketers Use Retina-Tracking and Facial-Scanning Devices 

    The latest technological advances have allowed for marketers to perform experiments that used to be the things only considered in science fiction.   Shoppers may soon have their retinas and facial expressions scanned to determine their product preferences.  Although these scans are not available on the grocery store shelf, they have been used in product research.

    The Wall Street Journal reported, “Kimberly-Clark’s researchers used computer screens outfitted with retina-tracking cameras when testing the newest packaging for its Viva paper towels in 2009. Their goal was to find which designs got noticed in the first 10 seconds a shopper looked at a shelf—a crucial window when products are recognized and placed in the shopping cart. They also wanted to know if the preferences held up on different count packages, from single rolls to multipacks.”

    Researchers have found that they may obtain more accurate data this way than through the use of traditional surveys.  The retina-tracking devices are useful because the human eye can detect information very quickly.  It’s not just our eyes that can give marketers important information.  Some companies have used brain scans to determine product preferences.  Now with facial recognition software, even more customer data can be compiled as companies can “track involuntary facial expressions to gauge true emotional reaction.”

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    • drdianehamilton 7:05 am on July 19, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Hi Raymond,

      Thanks for your comments. My links to my sites like Linkedin and Facebook at listed at the top right of my blog. You can also find out more on the about Dr. Diane Hamilton page listed below that. 🙂

      Dr. Diane

  • drdianehamilton 11:48 am on November 3, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Academic journal, , , ArXiv, , , Free Online Journals, Journals, Peer review, research, Ulrich's Periodicals Directory   

    What is a Peer-Reviewed Journal? 

    Today’s Ask Dr. Diane:  My professor told me I have to cite using scholarly, peer-reviewed journals.  What does that mean?

    College students are often asked to include scholarly peer-reviewed journals as sources for citations.  If the school offers an online library, it can be easy to search for these journals by simply marking the box under the search line that lists something like “search for peer-reviewed journals only” or “scholarly peer-reviewed”.  By marking this box, anything that comes up in the search should be appropriate to use for college-level assignments.

    A peer-reviewed journal insures that the article is of the highest quality and reflects sound research.  Library.usm.main.edu does a nice job of explaining the peer review process:

    • Articles submitted by authors are evaluated by a group of peer experts in the field.
    • The reviewers recommend whether the submitted article be published, revised, or rejected.
    • This review process is often performed “blind”, meaning the reviewers do not know the names or academic affiliations of the authors, and the authors do not know who is reviewing their work.

    Ulrich’s Periodical Directory Online is a link where the journals’ title can be submitted to get a report about whether the journal is actually peer-reviewed. 

    What is meant by scholarly journals?  CalPoly explained, “Scholarly journals contain articles written by, and addressed to, experts in a discipline. They are concerned with academic study, especially research, and demonstrate the methods and concerns of scholars. The main purpose of a scholarly journal is to report original research or experimentation and to communicate this information to the rest of the scholarly world. The language of scholarly journals reflects the discipline covered, as it assumes some knowledge or background on the part of the reader. Scholarly journals always rigorously cite their sources in the form of footnotes or bibliographies. Many scholarly journals are published by professional organizations.”

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  • drdianehamilton 7:21 am on October 4, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Doctoral Dissertation, , , , , , research, , SPSS, ,   

    Top 10 Tips for Surviving a Doctoral Dissertation 

    Today’s Ask Dr. Diane:  Do you have any suggestions on how to avoid the pitfalls many other doctoral students may have encountered when writing their dissertations?

    As a doctoral chair, I guide students through the process of writing a dissertation.  There are different problems that many of them may face based on the topics they chose to study.  I prefer to chair quantitative, business-related studies, so my suggestions may be slanted in that direction.

    Here are the top 10 things that I think a doctoral student should be made aware of from the beginning:

    1. The process will probably take longer than you think.  There may be a set of doctoral courses required for the dissertation part of your degree.  For example, there may be Class 1, 2, and 3.  They will explain that if you don’t finish 1, you can take 1a and 1b, etc.  Be prepared to take 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, etc.  Remember that every time you take the class, it costs money.  Have it in your budget in case you need extra courses.
    2. Find a good doctoral chair (also called doctoral mentor).  The school will probably have a website that lists professors that you can pick from, to be your chair.  Go through the lists carefully to find one that fits your topic and your needs.  Send them a very polite letter of request to be your chair/mentor.  Do not send a bulk message to a lot of potential chairs.  This is seen as tacky.   I recommend talking to them on the phone prior to signing up with any of them.  If they don’t want to do this, you may want to pick someone who is more hospitable.  Find out if they work at your speed.  I had two different chairs in my journey.  The first one was not a good fit for me.  The second was much better. Keep in mind that you can probably change chairs later if you find out it isn’t working for you.
    3. Become an APA expert.  Most schools require that your paper is in APA 6th edition right now.  Click here for writing help.  When you submit a dissertation, the review board will be beyond picky about this.  Every space, every heading, every table, etc. has to be exact.  Schools usually have writing centers that can help you with APA as well. 
    4. Find a good statistician.  If you are going to do a quantitative study, you will need an excellent statistician for guidance.  It helps to have SPSS software as well. It is important to understand how to do a Power Analysis when deciding on your population and sample size.
    5. Strong editing is a must.  Schools are very picky about anthropomorphisms and they don’t like what they call “fluff” wording.  They want the writing to sound scholarly.  Avoid using words like:  However, In Addition, Therefore.  Do not refer to yourself in the document.  Example:  The research did blah blah blah.  Don’t use the wording “the researcher” unless you are referring to someone other than you.  There should be no first person references in the paper at all. The proposal will be written in future tense so everything you write will be about what will happen.  The only thing that the proposal has in past tense is what others have written.  For example:  Hamilton (2011) stated blah blah blah is OK but everything that you propose to do must be in future tense.  There should be no personal bias.  Use research citations to back up your points.  When you write Chapters 1-3 of the proposal, you need to refer to your study as the proposed study.  Do not forget to include the word proposed
    6. Have a good template.  Some schools use a company called Bold that offers a dissertation template that has all of the formatting set up already.  These templates usually cost under $100 and are worth it.  They have the hard parts like the table of contents set up for you.  Some students try to write their dissertation in a regular Word document first and transfer it over to the Bold document later. This can cause a real headache with formatting and I don’t recommend it.
    7. Set up a schedule and become organized.  I have seen students flounder because they find the process overwhelming and don’t know where to begin.  Setting up a schedule for when you will do things is very helpful.  Set aside a certain number of hours in the week dedicated to your research and writing.   Usually the first doctoral class is set up to create Chapters 1-3 of your proposal.  It may be helpful to begin with Chapter 2 first to research the topic you have in mind. Look for areas in the research where there are gaps that still need addressing.  When you have written about everything others have done regarding your topic in Chapter 2, it should help highlight the exact area where you want to focus for Chapter 1.
    8. Download past dissertations. Looking at past dissertations written by students at your school can be very helpful.  It will give you a template of the format that is appropriate for your school and show you how others handled specific sections.
    9. Keep studies in notebooks.  I personally found it helpful to keep all of the studies I referenced in notebooks. I would alphabetize them by author last name.  I had 5 or 6 different notebooks based on the topics.  For example, since my dissertation was on emotional intelligence and its impact on sales performance, I would have a notebook about sales studies, another about emotional intelligence tests, another about emotional intelligence in workplace, etc. 
    10. Don’t give up.  Think of writing a dissertation as you would writing a book.  It has chapters and has to be approached one step at a time.  You wouldn’t write a book all in one day and you can’t write a dissertation that way either.  Sometimes students fail to see the light at the end of the tunnel.  It’s there.  It just takes a while to get there.

    I recommend reading some of the following books:

    APA Publication Manual 6th Edition

    Business Research Methods

    Research Strategies

    Methods in Behavioral Research

     
  • drdianehamilton 4:46 pm on August 2, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CornellUniversity, , , , , research, , ,   

    Spot the Fake Smile: Fun Test That May Surprise You 

    Have you ever wondered if that smile someone flashed you is sincere?  You might want to check out some research on the BBC Science site.  “Their experiment is designed to test whether you can spot the difference between a fake smile and a real one.  It has 20 questions and should take you 10 minutes. It is based on research by Professor Paul Ekman, a psychologist at the University of California. Each video clip will take approximately 15 seconds to load on a 56k modem and you can only play each smile once.”

    I took the test and only got 14 out of 20 correct.  According to this research, I am not alone in having difficulty spotting the fake smiles.  “Most people are surprisingly bad at spotting fake smiles. One possible explanation for this is that it may be easier for people to get along if they don’t always know what others are really feeling. Although fake smiles often look very similar to genuine smiles, they are actually slightly different, because they are brought about by different muscles, which are controlled by different parts of the brain.”

    If that is the case, I guess getting a 70% is that bad.  I personally found one of the smiles to be a little disturbing.  I noticed that I did get that one correct.  Click here to take the Spot The Fake Smile Test.

     
    • Terra 6:35 pm on August 3, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      I got 17 out of 20 right.

  • drdianehamilton 2:22 pm on October 28, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Anagrams, , , , epitaphs, extraordinary lists, , , oxymorons, pangrams, research, , words   

    Top 5 Most Intriguing Lists 

    The How Stuff Works website is a great resource to find out just about everything about anything.  While doing research for my books, I ran into some interesting lists that I will be sharing with my students.  I particularly like the list of misspelled words, but check out the others on the list below:

    Top 5 Most Intriguing Lists
    While you can browse through hundreds of fascinating lists at Extraordinary Lists, here are 5 lists that we feel are certain to amaze and entertain:

     
  • drdianehamilton 12:18 pm on September 15, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Lie to Me, , , research, Salovey and Mayer, , ,   

    Facial Recognition and Emotional Intelligence 

    I have quite a few of my doctoral students who are working on their dissertation on emotional intelligence.  In our book, It’s Not You It’s Your Personality, Toni Rothpletz and I include a chapter about emotional intelligence.  When I wrote my dissertation on the relationship between emotional intelligence and sales performance, I found one book to be particularly useful in explaining the different models.  If you are researching emotional intelligence, I would suggest reading:  Emotional Intelligence:  Key Readings on the Mayer and  Salovey Model.   I think another very interesting and useful thing to read on the topic is this article by Mayer, et al,  Human Abilities: Emotional Intelligence.  It has some very comprehensive information about emotional intelligence, the difference approaches and measurement techniques, as well as what it does and does not predict. No list of important reading in the area of emotional intelligence would be complete without mentioning Daniel Goleman’s book as well . . . See: Emotional Intelligence:  Why it Can Matter More than IQ.

    One of my students is looking into adding the facial recognition aspect to her studies.  If you missed my blog about taking facial recognition quizzes, click here.   For those of you who have seen the TV show Lie to Me, they have some interesting research they tie into that show about facial recognition.  Dr. Paul Ekman’s work  was the inspiration for this show.  On his site, he discusses whether you can be like the show’s character Cal Lightman.  Ekman does a review of the show on a blog where he points out what is based on truth and what is not.   Eckman has produced some courses for facial recognition called the Microexpression Training Tool or METT and the Subtle Training Expression Tool SETT.  Click here for more information.  To find out more about Dr. Ekman’s books, including one he wrote with the Dalai Lama, click here.

     
  • drdianehamilton 2:03 pm on September 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , brain test, Cambridge, Celebrity Quiz, , , educational test, , , memory test, Prosopagnosia, , Recall (memory), Recognize Celebrity Quiz, research, , test my brain, Tests   

    Harvard – Test Your Brain, Facial Recognition, Ability to Recognize Celebrities – Fun and Educational 

    One of my doctoral students is researching information about facial recognition.  Click here to take a test to see how well you are able to recall faces.  I took the Cambridge Face Memory Test and got a 94%.  It seems easy at first but then it gets harder. There are three different tests to take.  It’s free but they do require you to give your email.  This is developed by faceblind.org /Harvard.  This site is dedicated to understanding prosopagnosia which means face blindness. 

    They also have a newer test they have added to test your mind and brain function.  I took the Keeping Things in Mind test.  It was interesting to see that I did better than I had expected on the vocabulary section.  They threw a few words in there to keep you on your toes. 

    If you are interested in your math abiltities, take their quiz by clicking here

    Do you think you can recognize famous celebrities faces?  Take their quiz by clicking here

    If you are wondering what you get out of taking the tests other than just having fun . . . According to their site:  By participating in these experiments, you can learn a bit about your personality and individual aptitudes.   All of the experiments are designed to provide personalized feedback that is specific to you.  By making research relevant and helpful to individuals like you, their aim is to make psychology and brain research more accessible and, ultimately, to promote awareness of scientific research.  As Test My Brain grows and evolves, their hope is to continually expand their educational content, presenting the latest in brain research as well as results and what has been learned from these experiments.

    If you are interested in seeing the anatomy of your brain, check out this video:

     
  • drdianehamilton 2:09 am on September 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , research, , , Work–life balance   

    Millennial Women – What Millennial Women Think 

    Millennial women – born between 1980 and 1995 – are part of a generation that’s bigger than the baby boomers and more influential. Studies indicate that millennial women believe work-life balance is achievable and don’t see gender bias as an issue. They’re entering a workforce that is 50% women and will soon dominate the workplace. If you’re a millennial woman, how do you see yourself as different from previous generations, and what are your expectations for the future? Share Your Opinions

    Working Millennials

    If you have not already seen it, I would recommend watching the 60 Minutes show “The Millennials are Coming”. It is an interesting look at the expectations of post-boomer generations. Dr. Twenge has also done some important research in this area. She has been cited as saying, “today’s employees are prepared to take greater risks and are encouraged and rewarded for thinking outside of the box rather than sticking to the traditional ways of doing things.” This can be advantageous, because it steers the organization away from group-think and promotes more of an entrepreneurial atmosphere. I think today’s women are much more open to new challenges. I believe understanding personalities and making adjustments based on having emotional intelligence is going to be a big factor in success and that is why my daughter, Toni Rothpletz, and I wrote our book about understanding personalities in the workplace where we address this issue in the post-boomer generation workforce. http://www.drdianehamilton.com
    —DrDianeHamilton
     
  • drdianehamilton 10:55 am on September 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , age, , , Dr. Grupta, , empty nester, , family, Green, Green Party, , Keirsey Research, love, , , Politics, research, , wealth   

    Keirsey’s Results Show Wealthy Extroverts Are Happiest Americans 

    In Dr. Grupta’s blog, he wrote about: Who are the happiest Americans? According to a new study, they may be extroverted, earning more than $75,000 a year, healthy, and engaged. The analysis was conducted by Keirsey Research, an organization that looks at how personality relates to a person’s preferences in  consumer choices, political opinion, and a variety of other factors. Click here for the rest of Grupta’s article.

    In our book about personalities, my daughter, Toni Rothpletz, and I discuss Keirsey’s temperament research.  If you are interested in reading more about the results of Keirsey’s study that showed “Wealthy Extroverts are the Happiest Americans” click here.  Some highlights from the results of this study showed:

    • Personality. 63 percent of Americans rate themselves as very or somewhat happy. Extroverts (74 percent), however, are much happier than introverts (56 percent).
    • Wealth. In general, the higher the household income, the happier the individual. 72 percent of those with an annual household income of $75,000 or more are very or somewhat happy, compared to 59 percent of those with an annual household income of $50,000 or less.
    • Love. Not surprisingly, being engaged promotes above average happiness (71 percent very or somewhat happy). Those who are separated but not divorced are least happy when it comes to love (48 percent).
    • Age. Americans get progressively happier as they get older, with one exception. Happiness takes a dip between the ages of 35-44 (58 percent are very or somewhat happy), when parental and career pressures are typically at their peak.
    • Family. “Empty nesters” are most happy (73 percent very or somewhat happy), while those who are divorced and sharing custody are least happy (56 percent). Individuals who do not have children cite average happiness (62 percent).
    • Education. In most cases, more education means more happiness. There was no difference, however, between the happiness of those with a bachelor’s degree and those with a graduate degree (68 percent very or somewhat happy).
    • Politics. Democrats and Republicans are equally happy (roughly 70 percent very or somewhat happy), while Green Party affiliates are the least happy (52 percent).
     
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