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  • drdianehamilton 9:14 am on January 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ABSEL, , Burnout, , , , Penn State, , Teaching   

    Avoiding Teacher Burnout: New Research Explains How 

    iswt15burnout-02

    A recent report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation at Penn State found that Teachers are burning out at an alarming rate.  Around 30-40% will leave their jobs by their fifth year of teaching. There are many reasons for this turnover.  The four main reasons are stress-related and include:

    • School Organizations – Lack a supportive climate and leadership.
    • Job Demands – High-stakes testing and managing students with behavior problems produce chronic stress.
    • Work Resources – Lack of decision-making power. Teachers reported autonomy went from 18% in 2004 to 26% in 2012.
    • Teacher Social and Emotional Competence – High stress and low social-emotional competence training.

    teacherstudy

    When teachers are stressed, teachers, students, and schools suffer. High turnover costs schools $7 billion each year.  The research from Penn State found, “the cost per teacher is estimated from over $4,000 in rural areas to over $17,000 in urban districts.” The authors of this study found that there needs to be a way to prevent negative issues that impact teachers.  The authors also found few teachers receive professional development to improve their social and emotional competence.  Social and emotional learning (SEL) programs may improve student behavior and reduce teacher stress.

    In March 2017, I will speak about ways to improve student behavior and teacher stress at the ABSEL Conference in Myrtle Beach.  My research I will present mirrors many of the issues found in this Penn State research, including how behavior problems are the source of teacher burnout and ways to improve behaviors in students to proactively provide teachers a less stressful classroom environment.  To find out more about improving the classroom environment to improve teachers’ stress levels, check out: What other educators are saying; to learn more about the types of training teachers receive, check out: Classroom Management Agenda.

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  • drdianehamilton 9:45 am on March 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Adjunct, , , , , , , , , , , , , Teaching, ,   

    A Day in the Life of an Online Professor 

    Today’s Ask Dr. Diane Question:  I noticed you work for a lot of universities.  I’m considering working for several universities as well and I am curious what is your typical day like?

    Answer:  My days vary, based on how many classes I teach.  I like to teach between 10-15 courses at a time.  I also serve as chair for 10 doctoral students and work on 5-10 doctoral committees.  Additionally I take courses to keep up with technology, education, etc. A typical day usually includes about 8-9 hours of grading papers, providing feedback, responding to discussions/emails, guiding doctoral students with dissertations, and developing curriculum.

    I usually look at one school’s information at a time. However, I may have several school sites open at once, if my computer or the site is running slowly.  It helps that schools have different due dates for assignments.  For example, one school may require a “deliverable” or an assignment to be due on Mondays.  Another may have assignments due on Fridays, etc.  Usually it works out that all of the big assignments are spread out over the week.  However, most of them have discussions going on that I respond to on a daily basis. I will go to a school’s site to handle all email, questions, discussion responses, and grade any submitted assignments.  I do the same for the next school, and so on, until I have responded to every single item.  I do not stop working until everything is graded.   Most schools allow instructors a week to grade papers. I do not like to make students wait. If someone has submitted an assignment, I grade it as soon as I log on that day.

    On weekends, less homework seems to be assigned, so I work less hours.  I probably work around 3-4 hours a day on Saturdays and Sundays.  I do not usually take any days off, but that is not required. Schools usually require 5 or 6 days of work per week.  The nice thing about working as an adjunct is that you can decide how many courses you can handle. You can start off  with just a few and add more if you find you have the time.

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    • sandracoswatte 11:08 am on March 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      This is a very organized and structured day. Do you tend to work on the weekends or do you have the majority of your work done during the day?

      • drdianehamilton 11:41 am on March 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Hi Sandra,

        I tend to work from 6 to 8 or 9 at the most on weekends. I could skip those days and just work harder on the other days. I just don’t like to make students wait. Sometimes I only have an hour or two of work on those days. It all depends on how many classes I have going and whether doctoral students have dissertations for me to read.

        Diane

  • drdianehamilton 2:14 pm on October 17, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Sarah Kessler, SchoolTube, , , TeacherTube, Teaching, ,   

    Free Social Media Tools for Teachers 

    In my books, I often write about using social media tools.  I think they can be invaluable in the classroom.  I recently found a great article about media tools for teachers on Mashable.com.   I am a big Mashable fan.  They have wonderful articles about technology and every one of them is more interesting than the next. If you haven’t checked out their site, you really need to do so. 

    In Sarah Kessler’s article 7 Fantastic Free Social Media Tools for Teachers, she point out some great tools that can be used in the classroom including:

    1. Edu 2.0  – site that allows teachers to share content
    2. SymbalooEDU  – site allows teachers to organize classroom resources,  school logos may be added
    3. Collaborize Classroom  – site allows for online discussions to remove intimidation factor
    4. Edublogs  – site is great for group projects, newsletters and more
    5. Kidblog  – good site for K-8 classroom
    6. Edmondo  – site is similar to Facebook but more controlled environment
    7. TeacherTube, SchoolTube, Youtube – TeacherTube and SchoolTube are alternatives to Youtube for teachers

     

     

    To watch videos about each of these tools, click here to read the Mashable article.   

    Mashable already had a really interesting article about the need for social media in the classroom.  Click here to read that article.

     
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