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  • drdianehamilton 11:00 am on October 25, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , MediaPost, , , , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities, , Virtual community   

    MTV Scratch to Connect with Millennials 

     

    According to their site, “MTV Scratch taps the power of MTV to connect with millennials in new ways.  Partnering with select brands to pioneer new business models, we deliver award-winning, multi-platform programming and creative, consumer insights, brand strategy, product development and design.”

    I am interested in marketing and especially in the post-boomer generations.  Most of my students fall into that age-group.  In our book, The Young Adult’s Guide to Understanding Personalities, Toni Rothpletz and I write about the unique needs and issues facing this generation. 

    Because I teach a lot of marketing classes, I tend to look for differences in marketing techniques.  I found the tone of MTV Scratch to be interesting.  They are trying to market and appeal to the preferences of a younger generation.  In their FAQ, instead of having the traditional question and answer format, their responses are a bit different than what you see on most sites.  

    Examples FAQ:

    Question: Can I come work with you guys? 

    Answer: Let’s make friends first, yeah? We’ve love to meet you.  Hit us here . . .

    That is not the typical vibe that most sites project.  MTV has always been good at targeting their market segment.  I will be curious to see how well they do with MTV Scratch.

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  • drdianehamilton 10:03 pm on October 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Boston Legal, Christian Clemenson, , , , How to Suvive and Thrive in the Modern Workplace, Jerry Espenson, , , , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities,   

    Does the New Facebook Movie Imply Zuckerberg has Asperger’s? 

    image via nypost.com

    There has been some buzz on the Internet about Zuckerberg’s psychological state for years now.  The release of the movie, The Social Network, only has added to the discussion.  There is one scene in which they show Zuckerberg sitting in a meeting where he is making continuous popping noises with his mouth. 

    Those of you who have seen Boston Legal may recall a popping sound made the character, Jerry Espenson, played by Christian Clemenson.  The show’s character had asperger’s syndrome and was unable to stop making the popping sounds.  The portrayal of Zuckerberg in the scene where he “pops” may be implying there is something more going on with him. 

    One could simply watch that scene and think he is just being rude.  It also could  just be something that Hollywood added to make the movie more interesting.  Whatever the case, it does open up some interesting possibilities about the true personality type or psychological state of Zuckerman. 

    In our forthcoming book, The Young Adult’s Guide to Understanding Personalities, Toni Rothpletz and I list many examples of celebrity personality “types”.  To find out more about Zuckerberg and his personality type, click here.

     
  • drdianehamilton 6:50 pm on October 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Andy Samberg, , , , , Mark Zuckerberg INTJ, Mark Zuckerberg MBTI, Mark Zuckerberg Personality, , Saturday Night Live, , , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities,   

    What is Mark Zuckerberg’s Personality Type? 

     

     

    Mark Zuckerberg’s name is mentioned just about everywhere these days due to the popularity of the latest movie about the creation of Facebook.  In our book, The Young Adult’s Guide to Understanding Personalities, Toni Rothpletz and I give a lot of examples of celebrities with different personality types based on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or MBTI

    INTJforum.com recently posted that Mark Zuckerberg’s type would be an INTJ.   I’ve seen other chatrooms debate whether he was INTJ or INTP.  I think most people would agree that he is an introvert that is intuitive and creative so the IN part seems a no brainer.  The T part is also probable due to the fact that T personalities make their decisions based on facts and figures. 

    The only part that seems up for debate would be the J or P.  The J personality is more structured and on time.  The P personality is more spontaneous.  In the movie, The Social Network, they portray Zuckerberg as more of a J personality.  However, that movie is not necessarily based on 100% fact and had some creative license in how the story was told.  This has been confirmed by Zuckerberg and the creators of the film.  However, based on other things I have read about Zuckerberg, I would go tend to go think he is an INTJ personality, as he does appear to be more structured.

    To read more about personality types and their preferences for social networking, click here.  For more about Zuckerberg’s personality, click here.

    Related Articles

     

     
    • Evan 2:46 am on January 22, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      I’m thinking he is an ISTJ or INTJ, not INTP. He has Extraverted Thinking and Introvert Feeling, doesn’t seem to have much Fe at all.

  • drdianehamilton 4:25 pm on October 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 9 Steps to Work Less and Do More, Address Book, , , Get-It-Done Guy, , , , , , Procrastination, Quick and Dirty Tips, , Stever Robbins, , The Get It Done Guy, , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities, , ,   

    Book Review: Get it Done Time Management Tips 

    I sometimes like to review books that I feel are helpful and fit into my goal of helping people reach their lifetime potential.  A book that I feel fits into that category is by Stever Robbins and is titled Get-It-Done Guy’s 9 Steps to Work Less and Do More.  I am a fan of the quickanddirtytips.com site where Stever’s work can be found.  Also on that site is the Grammar Girl, Girlfriend MD and House Call Doctor.  I often send my students to the Grammar Girl site as I think it has a ton of helpful grammar tips, written in a fun and more entertaining style.

    Robbins book, 9 Steps to Work Less and do More, is also written in a very informative style.  He writes about many of the things that I also write about in my books (The Online Student User’s Manual and How to Reinvent Your Career) including time management, goal setting and more.

    How to Reinvent Your Career by Dr. Diane Hamilton

     

    I thought I’d point out some important things that he writes about in his 9 steps.

    Step 1:  Live on Purpose

    In his book, Stever stated, “If you’re anything like me, a lot of what you call work has very little to do with getting anything important done in life.”  I think this is a very important statement because I see a lot of my students and people I work with who seem busy but don’t really accomplish anything.  One thing that Stever writes about in this section that I feel is extremely important is that your actions should match your goals.  We all see the busy person who works the 80 hour week and yet are they really working smart or are they just working hard?  It is very important to have goals and to be sure that you are doing the appropriate actions to meet those goals. What is nice about Stever’s book is that he gives nice examples and step by step explanations of “how” to get to where you are going.

    Step 2:  Stop Procrastinating

    Procrastination can be a big problem for a lot of people.  In the book, It’s Not You It’s Your Personality, that I co-wrote with Toni Rothpletz,  I mentioned that I am a qualified Myers-Briggs instructor.  One of the most interesting things I found out about personalities is that about the people who like to wait until the last minute.  Some people actually naturally do better work at the last minute if they have a “P” personality as assigned by the MBTI personality assessment instrument.  While I agree with Stever that it is important to turn tasks into habits to stop procrastinating, there are some people who have a high “P” personality who actually work better when they are under pressure and have deadlines.  The only thing I would add to what Stever writes about here, is for those of you who have taken a personality assessment similar to the MBTI and found that you are a “P”.  If you are a high “P”, you should set time managed goals for when your project or activity should be completed.  “P” personalities seem like they are procrastinators because they wait to do things, but if they have a goal to do things that they know they must meet, they are more apt to do that thing by that timeframe.

    Another thing I like about Stever’s book is he writes about breaking things into baby chunks to make goals seem more manageable.  I often write about this in my blogs and my books.  It is like the movie with Bill Murray “What About Bob” where they talk about doing baby steps.  In my book The Online Student’s User Manual, I wrote, “How do you eat an elephant?  One bite at a time.”  It is a goofy saying but it is also very true.  If you are a procrastinator, it may help you to think of a big project as smaller more manageable pieces.  I find this helps my doctoral students quite a bit as writing a dissertation can be overwhelming.  By thinking of it chapter by chapter, instead of an entire project, it can be less intimidating.

    Step 3:  Conquer Technology

    In Stever’s book he mentions he used a PDA for a year and then reviewed whether the promised benefits were actually beneficial.  I personally like to use iGoogle to keep track of a lot of my information.  I often recommend this to my students and have written about it here on my blog.  I think technology can be frightening for many but sites like iGoogle are very user friendly and can be accessed from many locations.  You can keep your Calendar, Address Book, etc. there as well as your RSS feeds and many other things to keep you organized.

    Step 4:  Beat Distractions to Cultivate Focus

    I liked Stever’s suggestion of keeping an interruptions list.  I tend to do that a lot as well.  I am the type of person that has things pop into my head often.  This is not so great when it happens at 2 am!  However, I like to write down any ideas I have on a piece of paper and get back to them later.  The trick is to write them down and then get right back to what you were doing so that you don’t jump around and be all over the place.  Instead you keep your focus.

    Step 5:  Stay Organized

    In this chapter, Stever covers the all important area of having organization skills.  I happen to be pretty good in this area naturally but I see a lot of people really need help with this.  I have taught time management skills to organizations where we discuss keeping track of emails, only looking at mail once and prioritizing.  This is the type of thing he gets into in this chapter.  He does a nice job including examples of checklists, etc. to get his point across.

    Step 6:  Stop Wasting Time

    This chapter is a very important one as far as I am concerned.  I have seen so many people who plan the plan to plan the plan and never get anything done.  People are not aware of how much time they waste.  I often have my first year college students map out a 24 hour period of time to write down exactly what they do every hour.  It can be enlightening for them to see how much time they really waste.  Stevers mentioned to be sure that what you are doing is actually work.  I was surprised by how many people I have worked with that thought they were doing work but were actually doing things that were wasting their time.  I am a huge fan of multi-tasking.  Many people over-look the importance of this skill.  When I was cold-calling in a sales job, I could type my notes while I talked to the people on the phone.  Other sales people would talk on the phone and then type their notes.  I could make twice as many calls because I could multi-task.  Are you multi-tasking whenever possible?  You could free up a lot of time by doing so.

    Step 7:  Optimize

    Are you doing things more than once?  Are you efficient or just effective?  I see a lot of perfectionists who are very effective but lack in efficiency.  There needs to be a balance.  Stever mentions the importance of knowing when to get expert help.  Sometimes you can do it all and you have to learn when to delegate or ask others for help.  He recommends creating resource books as your learn new tasks to refer to later for help on things you have learned.

    Step 8:  Build Stronger Relationships

    I like how Stever mentions you can’t there alone.  I completely agree.  There are so many people and resources out there to help you.  I know I personally have found Linkedin helpful to meet people who have given me some excellent advice and direction.  I highly recommend checking out their Q&A area as well as joining some of their groups.  Don’t just join though; you must participate in order to the most out of it.

    Step 9:  Leverage

    In Stever’s final chapter he writes about making sure to leverage in order to get results.  He explains using automation to get leverage.  There has never been a better time to use technology and automation to your advantage.  He mentions combining rather than multitasking to get things done.  I think there is a time for both.  Many people get confused as when to combine and when to multitask.  In this final chapter, Stever gives some excellent suggestions for ways to obtain the results you desire.

    I highly recommend that you check out Stever’s book.  In it, he covers each of these topics in much more detail and gives great examples and specifics about how master these steps.

     
  • drdianehamilton 4:30 pm on October 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Guy Kawasaki, , , , , , , , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities, , , University of Tennessee   

    Introverts and Extroverts: Which Type Prefers Social Networking? 

     

    I recently had a discussion in one of the courses I teach about whether introverts or extroverts were more likely to be on the social web.  Some students made a good argument for why there may be more introverts on social networking sites.  Introverts tend to like to take their time to think about what they want to say before they say it.  Therefore, the online environment is a good place for them to be able to type what they want to say at their own speed.  Other students made a good argument for why there may be more extroverts on social sites.  Extroverts like a lot of discussion and interaction with others and therefore it makes sense that they’d be out there conversing, even if it was in written form.  

    I did a little research and found an interesting study by Maggie Morrison and Sally McMillan from the University of Tennessee. A total of 351 persons participated in this study examining the behavior and characteristics of consumers in user generated content.  Their findings indicated that most respondents read or lurk more often than they post.  They also found that men were likely to score high on the posting factor and women were more likely to score high on use of social networking sites.

    As far as the whether there were more introverts or extroverts, the authors found that participants who are more likely to lurk and post at social networking sites are also more likely to score high on the extraversion scale.

    Check out a blog by abisignorelli.com where the author speculated that there were more introverts by clicking here.  The author put together a quick one question survey to gather some data.  Click here for that survey. At the time of this writing, the results from that survey indicated 57% were introverts and 43% were extroverts. 

    Intro vs. Extro

    Intro vs. Extro

    Blog.thick.com tended to agree that more introverts were on the web. In that article, the author states that the internet has helped the introvert come out of their shell.  To see the article, click here

    Twitterwatchdog.com also agrees that there are more introverts socializing on the Internet, stating that Twitter is a safe haven for shy people and introverts.  Check out their blog by clicking here.

    Mashable.com noted in one of their articles that Guy Kawasaki, the 15th most influential Twitter user and one of the most recognizable names in social media, is a self-professed introvert.  Click here to go to the Mashable site to answer their survey to answer whether you are an introvert or an extrovert.   

    So what do you think?  Are there more introverts or extroverts out there social networking?  The University of Tennessee study showed more extroverts and the informal surveys showed more introverts.   In our book, The Young Adult’s Guide to Understanding Personalities, Toni Rothpletz and I write about the differences between introverts and extroverts.  We are both extroverts and find the differences between the two groups fascinating.  If you are interested in learning more about Myers-Briggs’ and their definition of the difference between introverts and extroverts, click here.

    In our book we list several examples of each type of Myers-Briggs personality type. 

    Here is a list of some famous extroverts that we write about in our book:

    • Tom Hanks
    • David Spade
    • Oprah
    • President Obama
    • Johnny Depp
    • Michael Jordan
    • Matthew McConaughey
    • Ben Affleck
    • Robin Williams
    • Robert Downing Jr.
    • Sandra Bullock

    Here is a list of some famous introverts:

    • Tiger Woods
    • Albert Einstein
    • Sir Isaac Newton
    • Meryl Streep
    • Julia Roberts
    • John F. Kennedy, Jr.
    • William Shakespeare
    • Michael Jackson
    • Marilyn Monroe

    If you are interested in seeing more . . .you can check out the lists of celebrity examples in our book which will be published soon.  I will keep you updated.

     
  • drdianehamilton 3:17 am on September 30, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Census Bureau, , , Population Reference Bureau, The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities, , , , , Washington, Youth   

    Post Boomers Not Getting Married 

    In our book, The Young Adult’s Guide to Understanding Personalities, my daughter, Toni Rothpletz, and I write about the changing interests of post-boomer generations.

    The Wall Street Journal reported today that less young people are deciding to get married. “ Marriage rates among young adults have been dropping for decades. But data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau show that for the first time the proportion of people between the ages of 25 and 34 who have never been married exceeded those who were married in 2009—46.3% versus 44.9%, according to an analysis by Mark Mather, a demographer at the Population Reference Bureau, a non-profit research organization in Washington.” The changing interests of this post-boomer group has been evident in the workplace for a while now. Sixty Minutes did a nice article on how millennials have unique work expectations. Now we are seeing that this group also has unique coupling/marriage ideas.

    For more  information check out the WSJ article by clicking here.

     
  • drdianehamilton 3:21 pm on September 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , personalitytest, , , test, The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities, Washington Post   

    How to Prepare For Employment Tests 

    Many companies are testing their potential future employees. What can do you do to be sure you ace those tests? It helps if there is a way to find out what type of test they will be administering. If you know someone who works for the company, they may be able to tell you. When I was applying to be a pharmaceutical representative in the 80s, they gave me a personality test where I had to chose from groups of words that I would use to describe me and from words I would think others would use to describe me. Today, there are a lot more tests out there and it can be a challenge to find out which ones are being used.

    The Washington Post had some advice for the job applicant faced with taking a test. Some of the advice they gave were to find out details about the test, search online for practice tests to try ahead of time, try not to over-analyze the questions, don’t get freaked out if you just simply can’t remember something, and ask for your results so that you can improve on areas where you didn’t do as well.

    It is important to realize that testing is becoming part of the norm.  According to Forbes, “Psychological scrutiny and rigorous simulations are fast becoming a requisite part of the interview process. Gone are the days when a clutch golf swing or well-schmoozed dinner might score you a spot in the C-suite. The downturn has shed a decidedly unflattering light on subjective hiring practices. Even the standard application-interview-résumé-and-reference-check formula has come under fire for being too soft and unreliable.” 

    To try out some free aptitude and employment tests, check out:

    http://www.jobtestprep.co.uk/jtpsite/content/en-GB/3/chooseTrial.aspx

    http://www.careerpath.com/

    http://sjlibrary.org/research%5Cweb/iguide_subjectList.htm?t=36&catID=1095

     
  • drdianehamilton 12:18 pm on September 15, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Lie to Me, , , , Salovey and Mayer, , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities,   

    Facial Recognition and Emotional Intelligence 

    I have quite a few of my doctoral students who are working on their dissertation on emotional intelligence.  In our book, It’s Not You It’s Your Personality, Toni Rothpletz and I include a chapter about emotional intelligence.  When I wrote my dissertation on the relationship between emotional intelligence and sales performance, I found one book to be particularly useful in explaining the different models.  If you are researching emotional intelligence, I would suggest reading:  Emotional Intelligence:  Key Readings on the Mayer and  Salovey Model.   I think another very interesting and useful thing to read on the topic is this article by Mayer, et al,  Human Abilities: Emotional Intelligence.  It has some very comprehensive information about emotional intelligence, the difference approaches and measurement techniques, as well as what it does and does not predict. No list of important reading in the area of emotional intelligence would be complete without mentioning Daniel Goleman’s book as well . . . See: Emotional Intelligence:  Why it Can Matter More than IQ.

    One of my students is looking into adding the facial recognition aspect to her studies.  If you missed my blog about taking facial recognition quizzes, click here.   For those of you who have seen the TV show Lie to Me, they have some interesting research they tie into that show about facial recognition.  Dr. Paul Ekman’s work  was the inspiration for this show.  On his site, he discusses whether you can be like the show’s character Cal Lightman.  Ekman does a review of the show on a blog where he points out what is based on truth and what is not.   Eckman has produced some courses for facial recognition called the Microexpression Training Tool or METT and the Subtle Training Expression Tool SETT.  Click here for more information.  To find out more about Dr. Ekman’s books, including one he wrote with the Dalai Lama, click here.

     
  • drdianehamilton 3:56 pm on September 13, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , millennial marketing, , , , , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities, , , , ,   

    In our book It’s Not You It’s Your Per… 

    In our book It’s Not You It’s Your Personality, Toni Rothpletz and I write about the needs and preferences unique that the millennial generation.  I recently found a millennial marketing site.  It includes an interesting compilation of articles based on that group’s attitudes and values.  Anyone looking for some good information about how to target this unique group, should check it out.  This site is set up as a Wiki.  For those of you who aren’t familiar with Wiki’s, click here to find out more.  I have taught some courses on a Wiki and see some great uses for such a platform.  To see specific information about millennials and their special needs in the workplace, click here. To add information to the discussion of NewGens, the term coined by my Toni Rothpletz and me to refer to post boomer generations, please click here.

     
  • drdianehamilton 2:09 am on September 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , The Young Adult's Guide to Understanding Personalities, , Work–life balance   

    Millennial Women – What Millennial Women Think 

    Millennial women – born between 1980 and 1995 – are part of a generation that’s bigger than the baby boomers and more influential. Studies indicate that millennial women believe work-life balance is achievable and don’t see gender bias as an issue. They’re entering a workforce that is 50% women and will soon dominate the workplace. If you’re a millennial woman, how do you see yourself as different from previous generations, and what are your expectations for the future? Share Your Opinions

    Working Millennials

    If you have not already seen it, I would recommend watching the 60 Minutes show “The Millennials are Coming”. It is an interesting look at the expectations of post-boomer generations. Dr. Twenge has also done some important research in this area. She has been cited as saying, “today’s employees are prepared to take greater risks and are encouraged and rewarded for thinking outside of the box rather than sticking to the traditional ways of doing things.” This can be advantageous, because it steers the organization away from group-think and promotes more of an entrepreneurial atmosphere. I think today’s women are much more open to new challenges. I believe understanding personalities and making adjustments based on having emotional intelligence is going to be a big factor in success and that is why my daughter, Toni Rothpletz, and I wrote our book about understanding personalities in the workplace where we address this issue in the post-boomer generation workforce. http://www.drdianehamilton.com
    —DrDianeHamilton
     
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