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  • drdianehamilton 4:14 pm on April 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , writing   

    Has a Book Become the New Business Card? 

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    With the advent of self-publishing, realizing the dream of writing a book has become a reality for more people.  Many guests on my nationally-syndicated radio show have been authors. I was fortunate to interview Sharon Lechter recently, and she brought up how a book has become the new business card.  Sharon, of course, is the co-author of the Rich Dad Poor Dad series and several best-selling books based on the recently re-energized Napoleon Hill Think and Grow Rich series.  Sharon is the ultimate example of a successful author.  Most authors do not have Napoleon Hill Foundation behind their work.  However, many have access to sites like Createspace and others to showcase their writing skills.

    Years ago, Seth Godin, is a well-established author, made news when he decided to self-publish.  Godin had enough customer relationships that he no longer needed his publisher.  Publishers can offer a lot of advantages for a new author.  However, once an author is established and has identified their audience, they may not be as necessary. At that time, Godin told the Wall Street Journal, “Publishers provide a huge resource to authors who don’t know who reads their books. What the Internet has done for me, and a lot of others, is enable me to know my readers.” The Internet offers a platform that has changed publishing forever.

    The popularity of self-publishing is undeniable. The old definition of what qualifies as a book or being published has changed. Books can include fewer pages than in the past, and they can be downloadable e-books.  They open doors for speakers and consultants.  They offer international recognition.  More than 725,000 self-published works were registered in 2015.  “As the field of self-publishing matures, the quality of both content and format for many of these titles is becoming indistinguishable from those published by traditional houses,” said Beat Barblan, Direct of Identifier Services at Bowker. “In recent years, the number of independent authors topping prominent bestseller lists is a clear indication that readers are embracing author-published titles.”

    Has this made a book become the new business card?  Andrew Medal believed it had, as he explained in his entrepreneur.com article Books are the New Business Card in 2015.  This question has become an even more intriguing since that time. Books are a marketing tool just as a business card has been in the past because it establishes expertise, sets you apart, opens doors, and brings in new business.  It also begs another question: If everyone has a book, how has that impacted the value of having one?

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    • Akaluv 6:24 pm on April 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I think in a way, the book has become the new business card. However, what worries more is the quality of stories available online. Self-published books are usually fine, but on sites like Wattpad, the quality of stories is horrible. The sad part is most of these poorly written books are getting published, so I wonder what that says about the publishing industry.

  • drdianehamilton 2:45 pm on October 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , writing   

    Grammar: When It Just Does Not Sound Correct 

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    My job has taught me that a lot of people struggle with grammar and spelling. My first sentence brought to mind one of the most common spelling errors. Many of my students type “a lot” as one word, which is incorrect. There is no such word as “alot”. If spelling is not hard enough, grammar is just as tricky because some things that are correct, do not sound correct. I know I tend to say things incorrectly just to sound like everyone else. For example, people might look at you funny if you correctly stated, “that is she” instead of incorrectly stated “that is her”.

    Here are some of the most common mistakes I run into when grading papers:

    • It is not correct to state: in regards; it should be: in regard
    • It is not correct to state: between you and I; it should be: between you and me
    • It is not correct to state: me and Bob went; it should be: Bob and I went
    • It is not correct to state: please contact myself; it should be: please contact me
    • It is not correct to state: it has been a good year for Bob and I; it should be: it has been a good year for Bob and me.

    We are all guilty of making grammatically incorrect statements. I often find things that I have written where I have made mistakes. One mistake I recently noticed was that I incorrectly referred to CEO as an acronym. That is incorrect. It is an abbreviation. It is only an acronym if the letters may be used as a word as in the example of RADAR.

    I was always taught never to end sentences with a preposition. I have seen several debates regarding rules like this one. Some incorrectly written things become so common that they change the rules.

    With all of the confusion, where can you find help with grammar? Even the most educated people make mistakes. I believe a good editor can help. I am a fan of Edit911.com. I am also a big fan of the Grammar Girl website. Another website that may be particularly helpful is Grammarly. There are also some wonderful books, which include:

    The Bugaboo Review: A Lighthearted Guide to Exterminating Confusion about Words, Spelling and Grammar by Sue Sommer.
    Between You and I: A Little Book of Bad English by James Cochrane.
    Eats, Shoots, & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynne Truss.

    Related Articles:
    Have Some Fun with Some Common Grammar Mistakes
    Euphemisms, Metaphors, Clichés, Oxymorons, and More
    What is a Backronym or a Bacronym?
    Anthropomorphisms: When Not to Use Them
    Top 100 Vocabulary Words Adult Should Know
    APA and Writing Help Page

     
    • garrymaurice 3:05 pm on October 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting read. I’ve just started to study language more seriously so I look forward to reading more of your stuff.

    • Michelle Kenny 3:18 pm on October 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Hi Diane, How right you are. A friend’s friend has also written a series on grammar. Easygrammar.com

      Thank you, Michelle

  • drdianehamilton 6:44 am on November 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , writing   

    Professors’ Expectations: Helpful Writing Tips for College Students 

    Writing

    Students often struggle with writing essays.  Some have difficulty with structure. Others dread dealing with APA formatting. I teach everything from bachelor-level to doctoral-level courses.  The following contains some helpful writing tips that I have found may make writing essays a little easier.

    Citations and References:

    Many of the courses I teach require that students master the use of citations and references.  I have found that students often become confused about how to include these.  One common mistake that students make is to include a reference page without including any citations.  That is not correct. The problem with that is there is no way to determine what part, if any, of the paper was paraphrased or cited from that source.  Students sometimes think that listing a reference is a way to show that they used that information for the paper.  However, there is more that must be done than simply including the source on the reference page. There must also be citations.  Citations may be paraphrased or directly quoted.  If there is a reference, there must be at least one corresponding citation.

    • A paraphrased citation looks something like this: Hamilton (2014) explained the importance of citations.

    Students may also want to include directly quoted material.  I teach some courses where I allow this and other courses where I only allow paraphrased citations.

    • If directly quoted citations are allowed, they look something like this: “Citations may be paraphrased or directly quoted” (Hamilton, 2014, p. 1).

    I prefer that my students paraphrase their citations. This may help demonstrate that they understand the content. However, it is important that if any information is paraphrased or quoted directly from a source, the author and year information must be included (list n.d. if no date is listed).  There may be specific guidelines listed in the APA manual for listing page numbers and other identifying information. Students should be aware of the following:

    • Do not list citations without references.
    • Do not list references without citations.
    • Do not list the author and year information at the end of the paragraph and assume it covers the entire paragraph of content.  Author and year information must be included for any paraphrased sentence or directly quoted block of content.
    • Citations and references must be in APA format (for most courses). Do not include footnotes if APA is required.
    • Do not number the references; list them in APA format.
    • Alphabetize references in APA format.
    • Long direct quotes have unique indentation requirements.  I recommend avoid any long direct quotes. They are usually used by students to fill up space.  Professors may not like that.
    • Be sure the alignment of references is correct on the reference page. The first line of each source should be at the left margin and every line after that indented ½ inch.  See APA guidelines for help.
    • Use peer-reviewed scholarly journals for citing.
    • Double-check with the Owl Purdue Writing Lab for help with how to cite unusual sources.

    It may be a challenge for students to get into the habit of citing correctly.  There are some sources like Perrla that may help.

    Use of Appropriate Sources:

    Another common citing mistake is to use less-than-scholarly sources. Although I enjoy writing blogs and doing research, I do not recommend that students use this or any other similar site as a source in their research papers.  Blogs may sometimes contain news-worthy information. However, usually they contain opinion and other information that has not been peer-reviewed.

    There are many sites that students use that are not considered appropriate sources for research.  Blogs are just one of them.  The following list contains some sources that students should not use:

    • Blogs – Blogs are meant for things other than research. They may be helpful in giving insight into how to do things.  They may be fun to read in terms of content.  However, students need to realize that some blogs may not contain accurate information.
    • Wikipedia – Wikipedia is a common student favorite.  It contains some very good information. However, the content is written on a wiki. A wiki allows more than one person to add or change information.  Any wiki should not be used as a source for citing.  Wikipedia may have some very good sources listed at the bottom of the page.  If students start at Wikipedia to research a topic, they could look at the bottom to find the original source of information. At that point, students can search their school’s library for that source to see if it comes up under peer-reviewed scholarly sources.
    • eHow, Quora, or other Q&A Sites – There are plenty of Q&A sites that allow people to answer questions on the Internet.  Just because there is an answer on these sites, does not mean that the answer is correct or has been reviewed by anyone.  Think of these sites as you would a blog.  They may or may not contain accurate information.  Therefore, they should not be used to cite.
    • Dictionary – This is a source students tend to like to cite.  Although it is accurate and will give a good definition, some professors look at this as a kind of “cop out” source.  It is easy to look up a definition in the dictionary.  It is better to show scholarly research that explains the subject in more detail.
    • Books – Some books should not be used as sources.  If there is a textbook assigned to the course, it is usually a good source to cite.  However, not all books are considered “scholarly”.  It is best to stick to peer-reviewed journals if there is any doubt.

    Some professors will allow just about any source for citations.  Others are extremely picky.  To be safe, it is a good idea to get in the habit of using only peer-reviewed scholarly sources.  For more information, check out:  What is a Peer-Reviewed Journal.

    Schools usually have an online library where students can find appropriate sources.  Near the search bar, there may be a box that can be checked to ensure that the search only delivers peer-reviewed scholarly sources.  The wise students stick to the school’s library for research.  It is as easy to search as Google and the chances of coming up with proper research are enhanced.

    Other Common Mistakes:

    I notice that many students make similar mistakes.  I make comments on their papers to address these issues.  Many of them disregard my comments and continue to submit the papers with the same mistakes.  I thought it might be helpful to create a checklist of some of the most common mistakes that I see and give some guidelines as how to correct them.

    • Tense – Students should stick to third person rather than first or second person unless the paper is specifically about them. In this blog, I write in first person. I use words like I, me, us, and we. Those are fine in this type of setting.  In undergraduate and graduate courses, students must be able to write as if they are an observer.  It is also incorrect to write in second person. Second person includes words like you and your.  Students must learn how to write in third person.  Do not write a paper that begins with something like: I chose to write about this because blah blah blah. There is no need to mention the author (aka the student).  Just write about the topic.
    • Paragraph/Overall Structure – I often include a link in class that directs student to this Youtube Video that explains how to write a well-constructed paper.  It is important not to have an overly long or overly short paragraph.  I have seen students submit entire papers that included only one paragraph.  I prefer to see paragraphs include around 4-8 sentences.  If citing is required, it is better to begin a paragraph with a statement and then follow it with citations.  The citations are there to support any points.  Students must make their points before they can support them.  Students often forget to set up their papers to include an introduction, body and conclusion.  I recommend watching the Youtube video for help with this and many other structural and writing issues.
    • Microsoft Word Issues – Students often have difficulty with formatting issues.  I have created the following videos that  may be helpful with some of these problems:  How to Remove Extra Spaces from in Between Paragraphs, Working with Headers and Page Numbers, How to Change Period Spacing.
    • Using Scholarly Sources – Students may have difficulty distinguishing between the kinds of sources that are allowed for citations. If students’ first inclination is to search for answers on Google or if Wikipedia is their best friend, I recommend that they check out their school’s library search engine instead.
    • Font Issues – Students must be sure that their papers meet APA guidelines.  The font needs to be set at 12 point.  There should not be any special bold, ALL CAPS, or underlined information that does not meet these guidelines.
    • Confusion Between Citations and References – I recommend reading:  What is the Difference Between Citations and References. The reference page must be titled References and not Works Cited.
    • Amount of Citations – Students often do not include enough citations.  They must be able to demonstrate their research and back up any points.  I find that many students like to write in a story-telling fashion.  Others may already know information about a topic and write based on experience. It is important to cite even if you are a subject expert.  Some may be tempted to cite too often.  Every single sentence should not be a citation.  That is called patchworking.  It is important to make a point and then back it up with citations to demonstrate your research.
    • Follow Rubrics and Guidelines – If there are specific requirements for the assignment, it is important that students follow the guidelines.  If five pages are required, then submit at least five complete pages.  The title page and reference pages do not count toward page requirements.  If the professor has posted any additional requirements in class, it is important to go through that checklist to determine that all requirements have been met.

    Graduate-Level Expectations:

    Graduate-level students may be required to have a higher level of writing expertise.  These requirements may cause students to become frustrated. Some of my online students have not taken courses in a very long time.  Many of them have not learned how to write properly in APA format. I have a surprisingly high number of students who have difficulty with sentence and paragraph structure. Graduate students should not use contractions.  For example, words like cannot should not be written as can’t.  Papers should be written in third person unless it specifically states that the assignment should be written in first person. Students should support all major points and information that is not common knowledge with peer-reviewed scholarly sources.  The school’s library should be the main search source. Whenever information is not common knowledge or is paraphrased, it should be cited. 

    I have had some students who get annoyed when I take off points for these issues.  I post my requirements on the first day of class, so that there are no excuses for not following my guidelines.  However, there will always be some students who feel it is their right to write incorrectly.  They may not truly understand the narrative mode issue or how to cite in APA format.

    At the graduate level, it is up to students to learn these things.  It is important to write in a scholarly tone.  I think students should write as if their paper could be printed in a journal.  It is important that students do not write in an informal tone.  Some students like to insert personal anecdotes or other information that is not appropriate for the assignment or this level of work.  Unless the instructor specifically states that papers may be written informally or in some other format, graduate-level students should stick to a scholarly third-person tone that is supported consistently throughout with peer-reviewed research.

    There may come a time when an assigned essay involves something that the student has experienced or already has studied.  For example, an assignment might be to write about a famous entrepreneur.  I have many students that are fans of Steve Jobs or Oprah Winfrey.  They may know everything there is to know about these people because they have followed their careers.

    Many students make the mistake of writing in a storytelling-fashion, based on their own interpretation of what they think they already know.  If it is a graduate-level assignment, usually citations and research are required.  That means that students will need to find sources to support their writing.

    I commonly I see students write something like this:  I chose Oprah Winfrey because she makes me feel blah blah blah.  There are several problems with this sentence.  First of all, the paper should be about Oprah and not about the student.  There is no need to write in first person.  Unless the professor specifically stated that students should explain their feelings, the assignment should stick to what Oprah has accomplished.

    Students often like to refer to their feelings in their writing.  They also like to include personal anecdotes.  For most of the classes that I teach, this is not appropriate.

    Sometimes a student will drop me a note that states something like this:  “I already know everything about this subject, so I didn’t include citations.”  I understand what they mean. However, even if the student knows everything about a topic, the point of the assignment is to show what they have learned through research.

    Students must get into the habit of finding solid scholarly sources to back up what they have written.  Without citations, they have written opinion and not research.

    There are certain expectations of higher-level students.  They should be able to write in complete paragraphs that include around four to eight sentences.  Students should cite consistently throughout each of those paragraphs to support major points.  A strong introduction and conclusion should be included.

    When students cite, it is a good idea to paraphrase those citations whenever possible.  Some students try to fill space by including many long direct quotations. I have corrected papers where students had about 10% of their own information and the rest was directly quoted from another source. This is not acceptable. Some schools do not allow more than 10% directly quoted material.  It is easy to copy and paste what others have written.  That does not really show that the student has learned anything.  It is far better to paraphrase citations to show that the information has been processed and understood.

     Related Articles:

    Also check out this video for helpful tips I give my students to help them succeed in class:

     
  • drdianehamilton 7:14 am on May 10, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Alliteration, , Chats and Forums, , , Infinitive, Metaphor, Participle, , writing   

    How to Write Good 

    Even the best writers make mistakes.  Some common issues include alliteration, split infinitives, and mixed metaphors. Check out a fun list of writing mistakes created by Frank Visco (VP and Senior Copywriter at USAdvertising):

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  • drdianehamilton 6:44 am on March 22, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , APA Example, , , , , , , How to Write, , Term paper, writing   

    Top Resources for Writing College Papers 

    Please review the following video and articles for help with formatting, APA, grammar and other writing issues.  To return to Dr. Diane Hamilton’s blog, click here. For updates on help with writing, bookmark the following page:  Dr. Diane’s Writing Help

     
  • drdianehamilton 9:44 am on February 29, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , College Paper, , , Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing, , Reference, , , writing   

    How to Write a Perfect College Paper: Video Tutorial 

    The following is a video presentation that explains how to write the perfect college paper.  For a written version with more complete information, check out:  Checklist for Writing the Perfect College Paper.  There are some sources referred to in this video presentation.  Here are those sources and the links:

    Click here for doctoral dissertation writing help.

     
  • drdianehamilton 8:37 am on January 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Dissertation Checklist, Doctoral, , , , , Proposal Checklist, , , , writing   

    Doctoral Dissertation: Proposal Approval Checklist 

    In the years I have spent as a doctoral chair, I have read many excellent proposals and final dissertations.  Writing a dissertation takes a great deal of patience and time. Some students may become frustrated if he or she believes that the process takes longer than anticipated.  To avoid a lengthy proposal approval process, the student should spend time going over some common mistakes.  Although each school may have different requirements, the following checklist may be helpful to the doctoral learner prior to submitting his or her proposal for review.

    Common Errors Place X to Signify Compliance
    All Required Forms Are Included
    Note That Data Will Be Saved 3 Years Then Destroyed
    Paragraphs Must Contain At Least 3 Sentences
    Any Defined Words Must Include A Citation
    85% Of References Must Be Less Than 5 Years From Proposal Date
    All Sections Are Listed In Proposal
    References Are In APA Format
    Submit to TurnItIn Or Plagiarism Checker
    Submit To Editing Software Or Editor
    Submit To Statistician If Necessary
    Two Spaces Are Required After Periods
    Design Is Carefully Described
    Clarity – Person Reading Proposal Could Perform Study If Necessary
    No Personal Opinions – All Conclusions Substantiated
    The Word “Proposed” Is Listed Before Referring To Proposed Study
    No Use Of The Wording “The Researcher” To Refer To Writer Of Proposal
    No First Person References
    No Fluff Words Including:  However, In Addition, Therefore, Etc.
    Proposal In Future Tense; Will Change To Past Tense After Study
    What Others Have Written In Past Tense
    Long Tables Should Be In Appendix
    Long Citations Cannot Be On Two Separate Pages – Must Be On One
    No Slang Is Included
    Use Words “Which and That” Correctly
    There Should Not Be Any Tracking Changes Left In Document
    Headings Must Be In APA 6th Format
    Chapter 1 Must Start On Page 1
    Proposal Author’s Name Must Be Listed And Current Month/Year
    Watch Use Of The Word Randomly (Be Specific)
    No Anthropomorphisms Should Be Used
    Watch Implying Causal Relationship If None Exists
    Do Not Make Predictions
    Multiple Studies In Parentheses Require Names In Alphabetical Order
    Avoid Vague Statements Like Something Was “Poor”
    Articulate How Participants Were Selected
    Articulate What Was Done To Reduce Researcher Bias
    Do Not Use Vague Terminology Like “Others”
    United States Is U.S. And Not US
    1980s Should Be 1980s And Not 1980’s
    Stick To One Subject Per Paragraph
    Do Not Write In Contractions (Do Not Is Correct – Don’t Is Not)
    Do Not Have Back to Back Charts With No Explanation
    Use He or She Rather Than They To Define Subject
    Be Sure All Chapters Include A Summary
    Target Population And Sample Is Clearly Described
    Hypotheses May Be Numbered And Supported By Narrative
    Choice Of Method Is Clear And Substantive
    Punctuation Should Be Inside Of Quotation Marks
    Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) Is Completed
    Checklist Should Be Provided To Doctoral Chair
    Application Should State If Exempt and Why

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  • drdianehamilton 10:49 am on January 9, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Citing in APA, , , , , , writing   

    Top 5 Secrets for Online Student Success 

    Online education is growing at a pace that far exceeds general education enrollment.  Because of the popularity of online learning, many traditional universities are offering online courses.  Forbes recently reported that MIT will soon offer free education for everyone. With all of the online options available, students may be confused as to where to go for helpful information.  There are plenty of sites available to help online students find schools, locate loans and even determine majors.  What is not as readily available is information about how to be a successful online student once he or she is enrolled.

    The following is the top 5 list of things that can help the new online student succeed once they have already chosen their school and major.  Click on the blue links for more information about each topic:

    1. Learn Goal Setting – Read about setting S.M.A.R.T. goals.  The acronym stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant (sometimes also Results-Based), and Timely (or Time-Bound).  Students should set S.M.A.R.T. education goals. Those that neglect to do this may find that it takes them longer to graduate, while they waste time and money.
    2. Learn Tools Offered – Most online universities offer some extremely helpful writing, editing and plagiarism-checking tools.  The school’s online site may also have helpful tutorials to explain how to use the software (also known as the platform) that delivers the classroom information.  Learning how to navigate in the online classroom may take a little time.  However, after taking the first class, many students feel more confident in their navigating abilities.
    3. Use the School’s Library – Students may forget that their university has an online library.  It is important that students do not get in the habit of searching for information using Google, Yahoo! and other similar engines. A well-written paper is supported by peer-reviewed articles.  These may be easily found using the school’s search engines located in their online library.
    4. Learn APA – APA stands for American Psychological Association.  For college students, APA refers to the format in which papers should be written.  While APA may seem daunting to the new learner, there are some very useful examples of APA papers online that can help explain the requirements.
    5. Learn How to Cite – Professors often require students to cite research in his or her papers.  Most often they must cite in APA format.  There are some helpful sites to help students learn how to cite correctly.  Students must also learn how to paraphrase, include in-text citations and avoid plagiarism.

    Click here for more useful tips about how to be a successful online college student.

    Related article:

     
  • drdianehamilton 10:20 am on January 6, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Citation creator, , , , ISBN, , MLA Style Manual, , , writing   

    Site Makes Citing Easy 

    Citation Machine is a website that helps students learn how to format citations and references. According to the site, “Citation machine helps students and professional researchers to properly credit the information that they use. Its primary goal is to make it so easy for student researchers to cite their information sources.”

    The site also includes a “most cited today” section where it displays some of the most recently cited websites and books.

    A student can simply put in a site and author information and it will give the appropriate example of how to cite that information within their paper in APA or MLA. If the student has the ISBN number, it is even easier.

    The following example shows how entering the ISBN can return APA citation results.  First enter the ISBN.

    Then hit submit.  That will pull up a page that looks something like this.

    Click “Make Citation” and it will create the biographical citation information for the reference page as well as the in-text citation information that will look like this.

    Note that I did not enter the publisher or publishing city information in the prior example.  This led to a citation that is lacking that information.  I purposely did that to show that if information is left out, the results may not be perfect.  Although the in-text citation information is correct here, the reference page information is missing the publisher and location.  Be sure to double-check that all appropriate information is input or the output may not be correct.

    If you do not have the ISBN, you can enter the information you do have.  Note that on the left side of the screen, the site gives you choices of books, articles, journals, blogs and more.  Click on the appropriate source and enter the information that you have.

    Although this system is not fool-proof, it can be a helpful instrument in guiding students regarding APA or MLA citation and reference formatting.

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  • drdianehamilton 9:10 am on December 22, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Capitalizing, , , , , , , , , , writing   

    Words to Capitalize in a Title 

    Bloggers and other writers may experience confusion as to which words should be capitalized in a title of an article.  I sometimes capitalize all words so that I do not have to look up the rules.  But it is good form to learn how to write correctly.  The following rules apply to capitalizing titles:

    • Always capitalize the first as last words of the title as well as verbs, adverbs, adjectives, nouns and pronouns.
    • Consistently capitalize or do not capitalize conjunctions (examples:  but, for, and) or prepositions (examples: words that show a relationship between the noun/pronounce with another word – example:  from, over, around, about, before, behind) with five or more letters.  Older rules required no capitalization and newer rules require capitalization if words contain five letters or more. Exception: If the word is the last word or the first word in a title, then it should be capitalized.
    • Do not capitalize articles (example: a, an, the), prepositions (see examples above), conjunctions (see examples above) with four letters or fewer, and the particle “to” used with an infinitive (example: to do; to be).  Exception: If the word is the last word or the first word in a title, then it should be capitalized.

     

    Never have your title all in CAPITALIZED LETTERS because this is not only incorrect, it is considered yelling. 

     

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    • MegansBeadedDesigns 9:20 am on December 22, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the tips!

      I frequently write specific words in all-caps, for a comically dramatic emphasis.

      That’s what I love about blogging, it’s a looser form of writing and it’s okay to mess up now and again. (For me anyway.)

      • drdianehamilton 9:25 am on December 22, 2011 Permalink | Reply

        Hi Megan,

        I think going for drama is OK. I’ve done that. Also . . . I make all kinds of mistakes (sometimes on purpose). I agree that blogging is more loose. I think there are those that want to know the rules though so I hope this helps. Thanks for the response. 🙂

        Diane

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